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Thoughts On “Tarot of the Cat People”: A Traveler’s Report

“Tarot of the Cat People” came back into my life recently, thanks to the work of artist/author/creator Andrea Aste. Not having not used the deck for years, I still did not have too much trouble finding it, as I remembered that I had placed it in a decorative wooden box that was residing in my guest bedroom. It was a joy to look at and work with those cards again! Andrea based one of his ongoing divination sessions on artist/author Karen Kuykendall’s work with this deck, which literally included her imagining a totally other world for the Major and Minor Arcana to inhabit. During the session one of the other attendees, Robbie Pearson, mentioned that Kuykendall had written a companion book for this deck (one that I was not aware of). This is the book that I am referencing here.

Please do not take this as a review of the book – it is merely a stream of thought on what came to me as I was going through the book. The very first thing that just about had me dropping the book out of my hands was the fact that the introduction was written by the late, esteemed Stuart Kaplan, an individual that has done so much work in bringing the Tarot to the attention american divination audience. I fell right into the introduction, as Kaplan talked about the Major Arcana being allegorical in nature, and representing Vapala, the Diamond Kingdom, home of the Sky People. The Minor Arcana are defined as follows: the Suit of Swords, Thnossis, the Ruby Kingdom, home of the Fire People; the Suit of Wands, Twahihic, the Emerald Kingdom, home of the Sand People; the Suit of Cups, Azhengir, the Topaz Kingdom, home of the Salt People; the Suit of Pentacles, Kahulawe, the Sapphire Kingdom, home of the Rock People.

Kaplan notes that Kuykendall had a long and varied career in the creative world, including medieval inspired painting developed for the Jamestown Lounge Furniture Company, teaching for several years inthe Arizona public schools and at C entgral Arizona College (extension courses), and the University of Arizona. Her works have been shown inthe Phoenix Art Museum and the Tuscon Art Museum, and in many private homes. She also did papier-mache jewelry.

And … she likes cats!

I feel like I have read the book already – Kaplan has the capacity with words to make reality a very intense moment! This is not just a book that accompanies a deck, it is a reflection of the artist, her life, and her work. (And yes, she lived with multiple cats!) Sometimes we need to enter another world – now I feel that I can enter the worlds of the Cat People with a guide at my side – someone who will walk me through her world, and with a look or a gesture make me feel at home.

Each world is described in detail, so the reader feels as if they are there. I am not really a science fiction fan, but this deck and these worlds appeals to me. (As did the world’s that Frank Herbert created. I felt as if I belonged in them also.)

Thank you to Andrea Aste and Robbie Pearson for bringing this wonderful book to my attention!

(c) March 2021 Bonnie Cehovet

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Posted by on March 22, 2021 in Uncategorized

 

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Which Ancestors Do I Want To Work With?

I have recently started working with Nancy Hendrickson’s book “Ancestral Tarot – Uncover Your Past and Chart Your Future” (Weiser Books, 2021). The very first question that the reader is asked to work with is “Which Ancestors do I want to work with?” The reference is not to specific ancestors, but to categories of ancestors. There is a three-card spread that the reader works with, to determine whether they want to work with Ancestors of Blood (card number one), Ancestors of Place (card number two), or Ancestors of Time (card number three).

I drew the Knight of Cups, the Haindmaid of Coins (Page of Pentacles) and the Four of Swords from Brian Williams “The Minchiate Tarot”. Hendrickson suggests that when we choose which card to follow, we look not only at the type of ancestor that is best for you to begin working with at this time, but also you are likely to encounter. For me, at this time, the Knight of Cups (representing Ancestors of Blood) would be emotionally supportive, but might be the easy path. The Handmaid of Coins (representing Ancestors of Place) for me speaks of grounded and centered study. The Four of Swords (representing Ancestors of Time) contains a great deal of truth, but also a great deal of pain, and would require addressing many shadow issues (IMHO). The Handmaid of Coins (representing Ancestors of Place) is my choice of these three cards.

We are then asked to draw three more cards to show the impact that the first three cards would have. From the same deck I drew Love (Ancestors of Blood), the Four of Staves (Ancestors of Place), and the Queen of Staves (Ancestors of Time). Amazing at the emotional context Ancestors of Blood brings to me. However, this is energy that I don’t need in my life right now. My work is going to be with Ancestors of Place, which actually surprises me!

I will share more as I go deeper into this work.

(c) March 2021 Bonnie Cehovet

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Posted by on March 8, 2021 in Uncategorized

 

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Review: Ancestral Tarot – Uncover Your Past and Chart Your Future

Author: Nancy Hendrickson

Weiser Books

2021

ISBN #978-1-57863-741-6

“Work with the ancestors, and the person

you will find is you.” (Nancy Hendrickson)

“Ancestral Tarot – Uncover Your Past and Chart Your Future” is a 202 page book whose intention is to act as a guide to using the Tarot to connect with our ancestors. In doing so we are gifted with their wisdom, their insights, their ability to heal, and their power. They are there to help us understand ourselves, to heal, and to find our own power.

In her foreword, Theresa Reed talks about perceptions that we may have about the family that we know, and how we can expand those perceptions by looking into our ancestry. Tarot can be used to address the past, as well as the future. Having always felt that I was the “black sheep” in my family, that I didn’t really belong, this was great news! I use the Tarot and dreamwork to connect with family that I knew that have passed on, but now there is a way to connect with ancestors that I did not know. Reed notes that tending to the roots of our past assures that the future of our families will flourish.

In her introduction Hendrickson notes that she knew at a very young age that her ancestors were part of the special tribe that she belonged to. As she grew older, she knew without a doubt that there was a world beyond the world that we know. She also notes that ancestral work is multi-faceted, and that while some of our ancestors are willing to work with us, some are not. Ancestral work can trigger memories – hurtful ones, as well as loving ones. She reminds us that our ancestors were real people with real dreams. She also reminds us that ancestral work is sacred work.

Tarot spreads are included throughout the book, but the most important spread may just be the one that she asks the reader to do before moving into the book. It is a seven-card spread called The Journey Spread. She strongly suggests that the spread be kept in a journal for reference after the reader has completed reading this book. It is a powerful spread and sets the tone for the work ahead.

One of the first things that the reader finds out is that there are three major types of ancestors: Ancestors of Blood, Ancestors of Place, and Ancestors of Time. It is up to the reader which ancestor they want to work with at any given time. Instructions are given on meeting and working with your Spirit Guide, as well as creating a team of spirit helpers. Each chapter includes a Tarot spread relevant to that chapter, as well as journal prompts.

To work with this book you will need one or more Tarot decks, a journal to write in, and a pen or pencil to write with. I make my notes in an e-file, because my handwriting is not easy for even me to read. Come to this work with an open mind, and the exercises in this book will give you a deep knowing of yourself and your ancestors. A bonus to this work is that Hendrickson shows the reader how to develop their own Tarot spreads, which is very empowering. She also addresses Sigils, Runes, working with a Pendulum, Oracle decks, and sacred tools (such as Petitions, A Personal Devotion, Gratitude, and Prayer.

At the end of the book there are resources: Appendix A: Tarot 101, Appendix B: Tarot Practice Resources, and Appendix C: Genealogy Resources.

I found this to be a very profound book, and the Ancestral journey to be a very sacred one. This journey can bring up memories – both good and bad. If you hit a bad spot, put the work down for a short time. Work through it at your own speed. This is all internal work, and you will be a changed person if you choose to take this journey.

© March 2021 Bonnie Cehovet

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Posted by on March 2, 2021 in Uncategorized

 

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Review: The Tarot of Light and Shadow

Author: Andrea Aste, John Matthews

Artist: Andrea Aste

Watkins

2020

ISBN #978-1-78678-411-7

“The Tarot of Light and Shadow” is an amazing project co-produced by New York Times best-selling author John Matthews and multimedia artist/writer/animator/film make Andrea Aste. It consists of two 79 card decks and a 157-page companion book. The decks and book come in a sturdy, lift-top box.

The card stock is sturdy, and easy to shuffle. The cards are 2 3/4 inches by 4 ½ inches. The “Light” deck is a mauve color, while the “Dark” deck is a blueish color. Both decks have a ¼ inch plain border, with the card title/suit across the bottom. Aste has an amazing ability to take just a few simple lines and create a whole “other” world. The illustrations are an exciting gateway into another world!

The theme for these decks is the ability to explore both sides of a question at once. The Shadow deck representing our inner, instinctive world and the unknown, and the Light deck representing our rational outer world and that which is known.

The Major Arcana retain their traditional titles, with Justice at VIII and Strength at XI. The Minor Arcana suits are Swords, Cups, Serpents (Pentacles) and Wands. The Court cards are entitled Page, Knight, Queen, and King.

There is one addition card with each deck entitled “The Cosmic Mirror”, considered to be the equivalent of “wild cards”. Each card is depicted as a mirror, a blank speculum on which anything can be reflected. Some of the ways suggested in using this card are: (1) if you are using one deck, as opposed to using both decks shuffled together, this card can indicate that you need to switch decks, (2) look at the card before or after this card, or (3) use this card as a significator for the individual/situation being read for.

The card backs represent the mistress of Tarot as she presides over the mysterious city of Sapientia, where all knowledge is kept, and which lies between the realms of Light and Shadow. The card back is reversible.

In his introduction, Matthews emphasizes that it is important to understand that when we choose to work with a double deck we ae seeing truths from two different angles, mirroring each other.

Matthews also addresses how to work with this deck. He notes that many readers already draw a card from another deck to expand their understanding/perception of a reading already done. The concept of these two decks is to understand that they are two ways of viewing the same thing. What we do not want to do is look at Light as being positive, and Shadow as being negative. Three distinct methods of using the deck are listed, as well as ways to use the Cosmic Mirror cards.

In presenting the Mirror Spread, Matthews suggests that “The Tarot of Light and Shadow” is a parallel universe, similar to our own but subtly different. For me, the spread acts as the gateway between the two universes.

All cards (Major Arcana and Minor Arcana) are presented with an overview of the card’s energy, along with a paragraph each on how the card would be read in a Light Reading and a Shadow Reading. Color illustrations for both decks accompany the descriptions. The Cosmic Mirror card discusses how to use the cards (Light and Shadow), with color illustrations.

The section on new spreads and sample readings includes The Divine Fool Spread, The Eternal Truth Spread, The Cosmic Spread, and The Directional Reading. At the end of the book are links to the artist and author’s sites, and suggestions for further reading.

I highly recommend this deck to anyone wishing to experience reading with unlimited possibilities and greater depth.

© January 2021 Bonnie Cehovet

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Posted by on January 11, 2021 in Uncategorized

 

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Reading For 2021 From The Tarot Of Light And Shadow

I decided to use “The Tarot of Light and Shadow” (John Matthews and Andrea Aste) as the deck for my New Year’s reading. I used a three-card spread defined as follows:

  • What do I need to leave behind from 2020?
  • What do I want to take into 2021?
  • What is my focus for 2021?

I drew the following cards: VII of Swords, Justice, and The Chariot

My first thought on drawing the Seven of Swords for what I need to leave behind from 2020 is that this is a very appropriate card. While my 2020 was not as bad as it was for other people, it did have its up and downs. From the “Light” reading of what I need to leave behind, I am looking at the fact that I allow myself to become frustrated, which limits my perception of both people and situations. I need to learn to accept that I am going through change, and not fight it. From the “Shadow” reading of what I need to leave behind, is the thought of becoming entangled with people and situations. While I need to move forward slowly, I need to keep moving forward. I need to believe in myself.

I definitely want to take a sense of justice/balance into 2021! IMHO, the balance is always there, if we choose to see it. From the “Light” reading I see that I need to take with me into 2021 my ability to see myself and my situation honestly and clearly. I need to continue to see my truth and act on it. We draw to us that which we hold in our minds, so I need to hold in my mind that I want to deal only with truth. The “Shadow” reading tells me that I need to be fair and impartial, and not look to play the blame game. My actions need to reflect my words.

My focus for 2021 is taking my life in the direction that I want it to go in. The “Light” reading asks me to take responsibility for the life that I create. I can move through uncertainty, I can move forward in my life. Balance of mind and heart is necessary here. The “Shadow” reading asks me to get up when I fall down, dust myself off, and keep going. I should use my best qualities to nuture myself. Keeping my goals in mind is paramont – but I need to stay in the present and see at what cost I am accomplishing these goals.

These are just a few thoughts, and I will come back over time and add to them. Many thanks to John Matthews and Andrea Aste for gifting us with such an in-depth deck!

January 2021 Bonnie Cehovet

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Posted by on January 1, 2021 in Uncategorized

 

Review: New Era Elements Tarot

New Era Elements Tarot

Author: Eleonore F. Pieper, Ph.D.
Artist: Eleonore F. Pieper, Ph.D.
U.S. Games Systems, Inc.
2018
ISBN #978-1572819214

“New Era Elements Tarot” is a traditional 78 card deck that is accompanied by a 116 page guidebook. The deck and guidebook come in a sturdy lift top box, with cutouts on the two longer sides of the top of the box to make it easier to lift off. The cover shows the image from the Daughter of Water. The bottom of the box shows information about the deck, along with small scans of the Father of Air and the Daughter of Fire.

The foundation (basis) of this deck was taken from both the Rider-Waite and Crowley-Harris traditions. Four things make this deck unique, and not so traditional. The suits are named after their associated elements – Fire, Water, Air, and Earth. The court cards are renamed Daughter, Son, Mother, and Father, and feature people from four distinct world cultures. For the Pips, the deck retains Crowley’s designations for each card (such as “Illusion” and “Victory”). The imagery on the cards has been updated to modern times.

The Major Arcana cards show either an elementary, planetary, or zodiac symbol, while the Pips show a planetary and zodiac correspondence. Each of the cards is presented in the guidebook as text only. Each card is listed by title, with correspondences, keywords, card meaning, and an exploration of the card. There are two lines for keywords: the “+” line is the card interpreted in the upright or well aspected position, while the “–“ line represents the card in a reversed position (or in a position in a spread that represents a blockage), or its shadow side. At the end of the book is a short section on reading the cards, and a six card New Era Elements Spread.

The cards are 2 ½” by 5”, and show a sepia-like coloring on the back, with imagery for the four elements in inter-connecting circles in the middle of the card. The card faces show a ¼ border, with the card title and number across the bottom of the card in white lettering. Two of the cards have been retitled: The Magician becomes The Magus, and Justice becomes Adjustment. Adjustment is 8, Strength is 11.

The deck is monochromatic, in sepia-like tones of brown. The imagery has been updated to reflect modern life, rather than the feudal system of traditional Tarot cards.

The Magus is a male dressed in a business suit, with a lemniscate symbol over his head, standing in front of a “for sale” sign. He has his hands in the air, juggling modern symbols such as CNN, FOX, the symbols for Facebook and Twitter, Botox and Pfizer.

The Hermit shows an older man, in a suit and cap, walking with a cane.

 

The Wheel of Fortune features cards and other games of chance.

 

The Ace of Fire shows elemental fire centered in a circle on the card, with associated astrological and planetary symbols above and below it.

 

The 10 of Fire (Oppression) features a Leopard sitting on a branch in a cage.

 

The 10 of Water (Repletion) features a quiet lake with ten boulders in the water. The Daughter of Water features a Maori girl, shown in traditional feather dress, wearing a fishhook pendant.

 

The Father of Earth features an older man in simple street cloths.

For myself, I prefer traditional decks, with traditional imagery. However, I do feel that this deck has a sense of calm to it, that it is easily read, and that it would appeal to people of all ages, from all backgrounds.

© September 2018 Bonnie Cehovet
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Posted by on September 4, 2018 in Uncategorized

 

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Valentine’s Day Spread

Valentine’s Day Spread

I have been thinking about this spread for some time now. I wanted to place the focus on the one person that we need to have a primary relationship with, and that is ourselves. When we understand where we are with our relationship to ourselves, we can understand how to develop the relationship that we want/need with others. Here, we are specifically talking about a romantic relationship.

Communicating With Self

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Scans are from The Magdalene Legacy Tarot, Casey DuHamel, 2014, Grail Quest Press.

1     2     3

4     5     6

7     8     9

  1. Where I am in relation to myself?
  2. What strengths can I count on?
  3. What weaknesses to I need to acknowledge?
  4. What am I looking for in a romantic relationship?
  5. What do I bring to the relationship?
  6. What do I need from the relationship?
  7. What is my ultimate goal within romantic relationship?
  8. How can I accomplish that goal?
  9. How can I share my goal with my partner?

© February 2017 Bonnie Cehovet
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Posted by on February 14, 2017 in Tarot, Uncategorized

 

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Review – Oriental Tarot (Tarocchi Orientali)

Oriental Tarot (Tarocchi orientali/Tarocchi Foudraz)

Edited by: Giordano Berti
English translation: Vic Berti
Images by: Claudio Foudraz
Araba Fenice S.a.s.
2016

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Giordano Berti has presented us with the reproduction of a delightful deck, created by Claudio Foudraz in 1845, in Turin, Italy. The original deck (in the form of uncut sheets) is preserved at the Academy of Sciences at Turin, which graciously allowed this reproduction. This is a Limited Edition of 700 copies, printed on a special “Vellum” paper. The deck was rediscovered by chance by Giuliano Cripps, president of the Italian section of the International Playing Cards Society. It was made public by Nicola De Giorgio in the Playing Card Magazine in 2014. The publisher commissioned an expert artist to add delicate watercolor consistent with mid-nineteenth century style. A comparison between the original and the colored version can be seen here –  https://rinascimentoitalianartenglish.wordpress.com/oriental-tarot-1845/.

The Oriental Tarot, or Tarocchi Foudraz, is a Chinese style deck, done in the manner of the Marseilles Tarot (pips are not illustrated).  Claudio Foudraz, through his research, reinterpreted many characters (in both the Triumphs (Major Arcana) and the Court cards). Berti also notes that even the pips have been reinterpreted, in both form and geometric arrangement.

The cards and 18 page companion booklet come in an amazingly special box done in a beautiful marbled gray, with silver inserts. (It looks exactly like a book!) It is held together on the side with gray ribbons that thread through a central eyelet. The inside of the box is done in a beautiful burgundy velvet. The booklet is a treasure in and of itself, where Berti shares his wisdom on the fashion of “chinoiserie” that inspired Claudio Foudraz in the creation of this deck.

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The cards are 2 5/8” by 4 5/8”. The card backs show a repetitive pattern of black images on an antique colored background. The backs are reversible. The card faces show a minimal white border, followed by a thin black line. The background is the same antique color as the card backs. The Major Arcana (Triumphs) show the card number in Roman numerals across the top, with the card title, in French, across the bottom. The Court cards show the card title across the bottom. The pips show the card number, in Roman numerals, either in the upper left and lower right corner, or in the middle on the right and left hand side of the card. The Ace and Deuce of Cups, the Ace of Deniers, and the Ace of Swords show no number at all.

The artwork and coloring are phenomenal! Basic line drawings with minimal background and soft coloring that does not detract from the image. La Papesse shows a female figure, seated, oriental style, with he hands folded into her sleeves, holding a rose colored fan. La Lune shows two castles, with a wolf and a dog between them, and a rose colored crayfish in the forefront, in the stream.

Le Monde shows a male figure, dancing on the world, holding a wreath in both hands. I love the Roi De Baton! We see a male figure, seated on his throne, looking to the left of the card. He wears yellow trousers, with spirals on them, an embroidered, rose colored tunic, and a yellow hat. A rose colored umbrella rises over him from behind. He holds his baton in his right hand.

The V of Batons and the III De Coupe both show a reinterpreted symmetry for the symbols.

The Cavalier De Denier shows a traditional pose, with the character on horseback, holding the symbol for the Denier in his right hand. The horse faces the left hand side of the card, with his head turned to face forward. The Roi De Coupe shows a male figure, seated, facing forward. He is wearing an embroidered blue tunic, with lavender trousers. In his right hand he holds a cup. A blue umbrella rises behind him.

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The interpretation for Le Pendu is quite interesting, showing a figure holding onto a line that has been strung between two poles. He wears a rose colored tunic, with yellow trousers and rose colored slippers. In his left hand he is holding something circular.

The booklet starts out talking about the European infatuation with Chinse arts and crafts, reaching its peak between the XVII-XVIII centuries. Berti goes on to talk about the impact that Chinese art had in France in the second half of the 17th century, and how the Chinese style reached Italy through the Piedmont region. The late 18th century was to see the rapid decline of the Chinese style in Europe.

Berti leads us through the history of Turin lithographer Claudio Foudraz, who produced both French playing cards and Tarot cards. The imagery for the French playing cards (which can be found on existing sheets), shows one sheet of 24 figures, 12 of which are done in the Chinese style. Berti reminds us that, rather than representing historical reality, these figures reflect conventional representations that were fashionable until a few decades earlier. The point is also made that similar imagery can be seen in the paintings of aristocratic and upper class mansions of the eighteenth century, as well as in furniture and porcelain decorations.

There is a short background given on Foudraz, along with an in-depth note section at the end of the booklet. I would also like to note that color images are used throughout the booklet.

I love paintings from the orient, the beautiful fabrics and the flow of both clothing and surroundings.  Here we see sumptuous embroidery on the silk dresses, reflective of the aristocracy and upper class in China in the 18th century and the early 19th century. It is an amazing, seductive deck that lives in a world of its own.

This is a collectors deck, not only because it is a Limited Edition (700 copies), but because of the companion booklet, in which Giordano Berti shares his knowledge of Chinese fashion as it relates to the Tarot. A beautifully done work of art, that is all about art!

While not a learning deck, it can easily be used by beginners to Tarot, as well as those that are well versed in Tarot lore.

© October 2016 Bonnie Cehovet
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Posted by on October 16, 2016 in Tarot, Uncategorized

 

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Review: The Sacred Mandala Tarot: mystery, mindfulness and manifestation

The Sacred Mandala Tarot:
mystery, mindfulness and manifestation

 

Author: Heather Mendel
Artist: Heather Mendel
Foreword: Carrie Paris
A Word of Art
2016
ISBN #9-780971-097612

Sacred Mandala Tarot cover

The Sacred Mandala Tarot is a 78 card Tarot deck that is built upon a foundation of sacred geometry. It follows a traditional format, with the Major Arcana using traditional titles, with the following exception: the Hanged Man becomes the Hanging Man. The suits are Wand, Cups, Swords and Coins (Pentacles). The Court cards have been renamed to: Page/Student, Knight/Seeker, Queen/Seer, King/Sage. The deck comes with a beautiful mesh bag to hold the cards.

The deck is accompanied by a 204 page companion book. In her foreword, the renowned Tarotist/artist Carrie Paris makes a strong point about the manner in which Mendel encourages the use of the art of mindfulness into the practice of divination. This is definitely where I find myself lately – standing apart from outcome, while being very aware of what is going on in the present. Or, as Paris words it, how we align ourselves with the present. Paris goes on to talk about how our chosen beliefs affect our reality. I was very happy to note that the tone of the foreword was in keeping with the gentle tone of Mendel’s work. I have met both ladies, and they are what they speak – gentle, creative souls. Paris shares this quote from Carl Jung:

“What did you do as a child that made the hours pass like minutes? Herein lies the key to your earthly pursuits.”

That quote brought me great peace – it was/is an affirmation that I am where I need to be, doing what I need to do.

In her preface, Mendel sets the tone for working with this deck. Whether we believe that the future is pre-ordained (already scripted), or whether we believe that the future us unscripted, and evolves from our thoughts, this is what we are going to draw to us. By taking back our intuitive wisdom as our birthright, we can balance thinking with “non-thinking”, and feeling with “non-feeling”. We are consciously choosing to be in the present, enhancing the ability of this incredible companion book to enter into the realms of time and transformation.  From the book:

“Some who receive this deck will choose to continue using it in familiar and traditional ways, others may consider some of the new possibilities offered within the text. As always, the choice is ours and the future we create will be so influenced. May it be bright, deep, rich, creative, and fulfilling.”

 Mendel talks about belief, sanctity, intuition and psychic ability, divination, and the mythic Hero’s Journey. She touches on mindfulness, mysticism and manifestation, and the evolution of consciousness. She talks about the present being the key to the future, She describes her approach to reading the Tarot as an expansive and graphic storytelling of the present moment, and its choices that are creating the future. She also talks about mandalas as used in spiritual work, and creating them from shapes and symbols.

The Major Arcana is described as being composed of mythic archetypes, while the Minor Arcana deals with everyday life. The sacred geometric shape associated with the suit of Wand is the Torus and the mandala is composed of flames. The cards in suit of Cups is represented by a mandala of waterlilies and feature the Flower of Life. The cards in the suit of Swords is represented by a mandala of the clouds and sky and include Metatron’s Cube. The cards in the suit of Coins (Pentacles) is represented by a mandala of red rock and include the Tree of Life. Ending the introductory section is one of my favorite writings – The Desiderata. I was surprised to see it there – and very pleased!

Each of the 78 cards is presented with a full page black and white image, and the following categories: Card Name and Mantra, Key Words, Magical Mandala, Illustration Details, Mystical Motif, Meaning and Mystery, Mindful Manifestation, and Questions.

The following spreads are presented: The Four Worlds: My Reality, My Beliefs, Yes/No Reading, The Life Reading: My Potential, My Present, At the Crossroads: Making A Choice, Journey to Consciousness: My Soul’s Purpose, Connection and Consciousness: Love and Relationship, and Lighting My Way: From Dream to Reality.

At the end of the book is a bibliography and a listing of Tarot related websites.

 

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The cards are 2 3/4” by 4 ¾”. The card backs are black, with the geometric design of Metatron’s cube in the center, and are reversible. Mendel describes how she created the image: “I used Metatron’s Cube as a sacred geometric shape of 13 circles that when joined center to center offers 78 paths – that seemed like a perfect diagram for a 78 card deck. The white lines are outlines of kabbalah’s Tree of life.”

The card faces show the mandala for the card suit, with the card number in the center. The image is centered on the card, surrounded by a thin border that carries a specific color for each suit: Wands, Cups, Swords, and Coins.

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The Three of Cups shows three female figures, dressed in pink, extending their arms out to each other. The mantra the Three of Cups is: Celebrate the circle that is unbroken. One of the questions to ask is: With whom do you laugh the longest and the loudest?

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Death shows the image of an hour glass, with the sand running into the bottom. The mantra for Death is: Without expectation, I yield to change and welcome the new. One of the questions to ask is: What do you believe about death?

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Strength shows a dark haired female figure, seated, petting a black panther. The mantra for Strength is: Gentleness is strength, and strength is gentle. One of the questions to ask is: How do you relate to the wild?

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The Hierophant shows a female figure with her head balanced on her hands, surrounded by the petals of a water-lily. The mantra for the Hierophant is: From my heart I listen deeply and completely. One of the questions to ask is: What do listening and love have in common?

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The Emperor shows a male figure holding a clock, a symbol of Chronos and Kairos. The mantra for the Emperor is: I organize the details of the grand scheme. One of the questions to ask is: Are you able to summon The Sacred Warrior within when needed?

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The Ace of Coins shows a six-sided mandala. The mantra for the Ace of Coins is: Manifestation grounds intuitive vision. One of the questions to ask is: Do you value Nature as a teacher?

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The Seer/Queen of Swords shows a female figure, dressed in blue, seated, holding a sword in her right hand. There is a full moon in the sky behind her. The mantra for the Seer/Queen of Swords is: I balance my time between thinking and being. One of the questions to ask is: Are you a good listener?

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The Ace of Wands shows a magical wand bridging heaven and earth. The mantra for the Ace of Wands is: I celebrate my ability to fulfill my creative vision. One of the questions to ask is: Do you practice “being” as well as “doing”?

I am very impressed with both deck and book. The black background draws me in (as representing a void), and the simplicity of the mandalas and the “clean”, vivid images go a long way to being able to work with this deck. I appreciate the foundation in sacred geometry, and feel that this deck lends itself to readings, personal work, journeying, meditation, and more. The deck is limited only by the imagination/vision of the user. I recommend it as an investment in one’s self.

© April 2016 Bonnie Cehovet
Reproduction prohibited without written permission of hte author.

 
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Posted by on April 18, 2016 in Uncategorized

 

Tarot Pink For Cancer

Tarot Pink For Cancer –
For Inspiration, Empowerment, and Support

Artists: collaboration of 65 Tarot artists
Author: personal interpretation from the artists
Introduction by Mary K. Greer
GameCrafter
2015

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“Tarot Pink For Cancer” is a project under the auspices of Ron Leong and WizardToo, LLC that involved 65 talented artists within the Tarot community that came together and created a Tarot deck to inspire, empower, and support breast cancer awareness, and those going through the breast cancer treatment process. It is meant to be a fund raising tool to benefit breast cancer research.

Under the sponsorship of WizardToo, LLC (the publisher of the Tarot e-cards app), there is a printed deck available through Game Crafter (Tarot Pink For Cancer), and a Tarot app for both iOS and Android mobile devices.

This is a full 78 card deck, accompanied by a 22 page companion booklet, and a bag to store the cards in. (Note: A digital download of the companion booklet is available after purchase.)

In her introduction, Mary Greer (author of “Tarot For Yourself”) talks about the fact that we have all been touched by some form of cancer, or a life-threatening illness, whether it is ourselves, a loved one, a friend, or someone we admire. She refers to it as an emotional, transformative experience for everyone involved.  Greer notes that many of the artists found the experience of creating one or more cards was healing in and of itself. This deck is seen as supporting a healing journey – along these lines, Greer suggests giving the deck to someone that is going through the cancer experience, and then perhaps helping them out with something that they need help with.

Some of the artists are working in remembrance of someone they know, others are cancer survivors themselves. Greer notes that there are no rules for working with this deck – that each individual should use them in the manner that works best for them. She sees the 78 cards of this deck as 78 gifts and prayers for well-being – as indeed they are!

The 22 page companion booklet (which features the card Strength on the cover) includes a small write-up from each artist of what the card means to them. Color scans, including the Queen of Cups, the Eight of Coins, the Seven of Swords, and the Three of Wands are scattered throughout the booklet.

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The cards are 2 ¾” by 4 ¾”. The backs feature a pink background with white clouds, and a pink lemnescate in the center. The card backs are reversible. The card faces feature a light gray border, with the card name at the top, in black, against a pink strip. The card image is outlined with a thing strip of pink. Under the card we find the artists name, along with a short bio.

Here is some of the incredible work that came out of this project:

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The Magician (by Ciro Marchetti):

“The Magician represents making best use of personal power and skills. Through concentration and accessing resources, the individual determines the actions they want to take. The books on the shelf represent knowledge from study, the raven speaks to information coming from afar, and the owl speaks to spiritual/intuitive wisdom.”

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The Fool (by Arnell Ando):

“Fortune visits after misfortune. Allow yourself to be surprised by unusual synchronicities & gentle gestures. Fresh perspective during a challenging time. Revisit a sense of optimism and belief in an inner journey. Look to friends who cherish you. Trust your gut. Don’t forget to reward yourself with spontaneous, unexpected treats when things get overwhelming.”

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The Page of Swords (by Ash Goh):

“We face challenges on a daily basis. This word means Patience in Chinese which brings to mind the importance of governing our thought processes as we face obstacles that seem insurmountable. “We cannot change the cards we are dealt, just how we lay the hand. Randy Pascal, The Last Lecture.”    

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The Hanged Man (by Chanel Bayless):

“It’s time to let go of fears and give yourself a moment to reflect on the positives of life. Time is suspended for now. Meditate. Allow your spirit to speak to the universe. You are seeing life from a different perspective. Connect. Accept. Everything is turning around.”

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The Hierophant (by Sue Silva):

“The Hierophant raises her right hand giving a peace sign that represents blessings to all and especially to ourselves. It is now that we know we hold the keys to our own destiny. We are strong and everything is possible in this life journey.”

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The Ace of Wands (by Chris Ernest Paradis):

“When the Ace of Wands appears, your passions have sparked a a creative instinct to manifest new possibilities in your life. You have the tools and energy to do it. It is up to you to overcome your obstacles and allow this spark to become a reality.

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The Page of Cups (by Paula Millet):

“The Page of Cups brings you messages of love from your circle of family and friends. Their support will carry you through whatever is to come.”

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The Eight of Swords (by Rhonda Delaune Welch):

“Isolation, self-imposed restrictions, imprisonment, stagnation, confusion. The Eight of Swords represents someone who considers herself trapped and isolated. This card mage shows a woman who has intentionally disengaged from her surroundings, unable or unwilling to see the mental stairway leading up and out of her current situation. Swords, representing her thoughts, impede her from more positive possibilities.”

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The Four of Cups (by Paula Millet):

“Signifies a time to retreat and reflect upon the choices before you. This is an opportunity to evaluate how you feel about your options and the possible outcomes.”

The journey for this deck was not an easy one – not with 65 artists, each with their own perception and opinions! I was with it all the way, as an observer. I thank everyone involved with this project – especially Mr. Ron Leong, for holding it all together. The end product is a delight to work with, and is definitely the tool of empowerment and healing that it was meant to be!

© October 2015 Bonnie Cehovet

 
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Posted by on October 12, 2015 in Uncategorized

 

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