RSS

Category Archives: Uncategorized

Valentine’s Day Spread

Valentine’s Day Spread

I have been thinking about this spread for some time now. I wanted to place the focus on the one person that we need to have a primary relationship with, and that is ourselves. When we understand where we are with our relationship to ourselves, we can understand how to develop the relationship that we want/need with others. Here, we are specifically talking about a romantic relationship.

Communicating With Self

.

Scans are from The Magdalene Legacy Tarot, Casey DuHamel, 2014, Grail Quest Press.

1     2     3

4     5     6

7     8     9

  1. Where I am in relation to myself?
  2. What strengths can I count on?
  3. What weaknesses to I need to acknowledge?
  4. What am I looking for in a romantic relationship?
  5. What do I bring to the relationship?
  6. What do I need from the relationship?
  7. What is my ultimate goal within romantic relationship?
  8. How can I accomplish that goal?
  9. How can I share my goal with my partner?

© February 2017 Bonnie Cehovet
Reproduction prohibited without written permission of the author.

Advertisements
 
Leave a comment

Posted by on February 14, 2017 in Tarot, Uncategorized

 

Tags:

Review – Oriental Tarot (Tarocchi Orientali)

Oriental Tarot (Tarocchi orientali/Tarocchi Foudraz)

Edited by: Giordano Berti
English translation: Vic Berti
Images by: Claudio Foudraz
Araba Fenice S.a.s.
2016

img_1402

Giordano Berti has presented us with the reproduction of a delightful deck, created by Claudio Foudraz in 1845, in Turin, Italy. The original deck (in the form of uncut sheets) is preserved at the Academy of Sciences at Turin, which graciously allowed this reproduction. This is a Limited Edition of 700 copies, printed on a special “Vellum” paper. The deck was rediscovered by chance by Giuliano Cripps, president of the Italian section of the International Playing Cards Society. It was made public by Nicola De Giorgio in the Playing Card Magazine in 2014. The publisher commissioned an expert artist to add delicate watercolor consistent with mid-nineteenth century style. A comparison between the original and the colored version can be seen here –  https://rinascimentoitalianartenglish.wordpress.com/oriental-tarot-1845/.

The Oriental Tarot, or Tarocchi Foudraz, is a Chinese style deck, done in the manner of the Marseilles Tarot (pips are not illustrated).  Claudio Foudraz, through his research, reinterpreted many characters (in both the Triumphs (Major Arcana) and the Court cards). Berti also notes that even the pips have been reinterpreted, in both form and geometric arrangement.

The cards and 18 page companion booklet come in an amazingly special box done in a beautiful marbled gray, with silver inserts. (It looks exactly like a book!) It is held together on the side with gray ribbons that thread through a central eyelet. The inside of the box is done in a beautiful burgundy velvet. The booklet is a treasure in and of itself, where Berti shares his wisdom on the fashion of “chinoiserie” that inspired Claudio Foudraz in the creation of this deck.

img194-2

The cards are 2 5/8” by 4 5/8”. The card backs show a repetitive pattern of black images on an antique colored background. The backs are reversible. The card faces show a minimal white border, followed by a thin black line. The background is the same antique color as the card backs. The Major Arcana (Triumphs) show the card number in Roman numerals across the top, with the card title, in French, across the bottom. The Court cards show the card title across the bottom. The pips show the card number, in Roman numerals, either in the upper left and lower right corner, or in the middle on the right and left hand side of the card. The Ace and Deuce of Cups, the Ace of Deniers, and the Ace of Swords show no number at all.

The artwork and coloring are phenomenal! Basic line drawings with minimal background and soft coloring that does not detract from the image. La Papesse shows a female figure, seated, oriental style, with he hands folded into her sleeves, holding a rose colored fan. La Lune shows two castles, with a wolf and a dog between them, and a rose colored crayfish in the forefront, in the stream.

Le Monde shows a male figure, dancing on the world, holding a wreath in both hands. I love the Roi De Baton! We see a male figure, seated on his throne, looking to the left of the card. He wears yellow trousers, with spirals on them, an embroidered, rose colored tunic, and a yellow hat. A rose colored umbrella rises over him from behind. He holds his baton in his right hand.

The V of Batons and the III De Coupe both show a reinterpreted symmetry for the symbols.

The Cavalier De Denier shows a traditional pose, with the character on horseback, holding the symbol for the Denier in his right hand. The horse faces the left hand side of the card, with his head turned to face forward. The Roi De Coupe shows a male figure, seated, facing forward. He is wearing an embroidered blue tunic, with lavender trousers. In his right hand he holds a cup. A blue umbrella rises behind him.

img205

The interpretation for Le Pendu is quite interesting, showing a figure holding onto a line that has been strung between two poles. He wears a rose colored tunic, with yellow trousers and rose colored slippers. In his left hand he is holding something circular.

The booklet starts out talking about the European infatuation with Chinse arts and crafts, reaching its peak between the XVII-XVIII centuries. Berti goes on to talk about the impact that Chinese art had in France in the second half of the 17th century, and how the Chinese style reached Italy through the Piedmont region. The late 18th century was to see the rapid decline of the Chinese style in Europe.

Berti leads us through the history of Turin lithographer Claudio Foudraz, who produced both French playing cards and Tarot cards. The imagery for the French playing cards (which can be found on existing sheets), shows one sheet of 24 figures, 12 of which are done in the Chinese style. Berti reminds us that, rather than representing historical reality, these figures reflect conventional representations that were fashionable until a few decades earlier. The point is also made that similar imagery can be seen in the paintings of aristocratic and upper class mansions of the eighteenth century, as well as in furniture and porcelain decorations.

There is a short background given on Foudraz, along with an in-depth note section at the end of the booklet. I would also like to note that color images are used throughout the booklet.

I love paintings from the orient, the beautiful fabrics and the flow of both clothing and surroundings.  Here we see sumptuous embroidery on the silk dresses, reflective of the aristocracy and upper class in China in the 18th century and the early 19th century. It is an amazing, seductive deck that lives in a world of its own.

This is a collectors deck, not only because it is a Limited Edition (700 copies), but because of the companion booklet, in which Giordano Berti shares his knowledge of Chinese fashion as it relates to the Tarot. A beautifully done work of art, that is all about art!

While not a learning deck, it can easily be used by beginners to Tarot, as well as those that are well versed in Tarot lore.

© October 2016 Bonnie Cehovet
Reproduction prohibited without written permission of the author.

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on October 16, 2016 in Tarot, Uncategorized

 

Tags: , , , , ,

Review: The Sacred Mandala Tarot: mystery, mindfulness and manifestation

The Sacred Mandala Tarot:
mystery, mindfulness and manifestation

 

Author: Heather Mendel
Artist: Heather Mendel
Foreword: Carrie Paris
A Word of Art
2016
ISBN #9-780971-097612

Sacred Mandala Tarot cover

The Sacred Mandala Tarot is a 78 card Tarot deck that is built upon a foundation of sacred geometry. It follows a traditional format, with the Major Arcana using traditional titles, with the following exception: the Hanged Man becomes the Hanging Man. The suits are Wand, Cups, Swords and Coins (Pentacles). The Court cards have been renamed to: Page/Student, Knight/Seeker, Queen/Seer, King/Sage. The deck comes with a beautiful mesh bag to hold the cards.

The deck is accompanied by a 204 page companion book. In her foreword, the renowned Tarotist/artist Carrie Paris makes a strong point about the manner in which Mendel encourages the use of the art of mindfulness into the practice of divination. This is definitely where I find myself lately – standing apart from outcome, while being very aware of what is going on in the present. Or, as Paris words it, how we align ourselves with the present. Paris goes on to talk about how our chosen beliefs affect our reality. I was very happy to note that the tone of the foreword was in keeping with the gentle tone of Mendel’s work. I have met both ladies, and they are what they speak – gentle, creative souls. Paris shares this quote from Carl Jung:

“What did you do as a child that made the hours pass like minutes? Herein lies the key to your earthly pursuits.”

That quote brought me great peace – it was/is an affirmation that I am where I need to be, doing what I need to do.

In her preface, Mendel sets the tone for working with this deck. Whether we believe that the future is pre-ordained (already scripted), or whether we believe that the future us unscripted, and evolves from our thoughts, this is what we are going to draw to us. By taking back our intuitive wisdom as our birthright, we can balance thinking with “non-thinking”, and feeling with “non-feeling”. We are consciously choosing to be in the present, enhancing the ability of this incredible companion book to enter into the realms of time and transformation.  From the book:

“Some who receive this deck will choose to continue using it in familiar and traditional ways, others may consider some of the new possibilities offered within the text. As always, the choice is ours and the future we create will be so influenced. May it be bright, deep, rich, creative, and fulfilling.”

 Mendel talks about belief, sanctity, intuition and psychic ability, divination, and the mythic Hero’s Journey. She touches on mindfulness, mysticism and manifestation, and the evolution of consciousness. She talks about the present being the key to the future, She describes her approach to reading the Tarot as an expansive and graphic storytelling of the present moment, and its choices that are creating the future. She also talks about mandalas as used in spiritual work, and creating them from shapes and symbols.

The Major Arcana is described as being composed of mythic archetypes, while the Minor Arcana deals with everyday life. The sacred geometric shape associated with the suit of Wand is the Torus and the mandala is composed of flames. The cards in suit of Cups is represented by a mandala of waterlilies and feature the Flower of Life. The cards in the suit of Swords is represented by a mandala of the clouds and sky and include Metatron’s Cube. The cards in the suit of Coins (Pentacles) is represented by a mandala of red rock and include the Tree of Life. Ending the introductory section is one of my favorite writings – The Desiderata. I was surprised to see it there – and very pleased!

Each of the 78 cards is presented with a full page black and white image, and the following categories: Card Name and Mantra, Key Words, Magical Mandala, Illustration Details, Mystical Motif, Meaning and Mystery, Mindful Manifestation, and Questions.

The following spreads are presented: The Four Worlds: My Reality, My Beliefs, Yes/No Reading, The Life Reading: My Potential, My Present, At the Crossroads: Making A Choice, Journey to Consciousness: My Soul’s Purpose, Connection and Consciousness: Love and Relationship, and Lighting My Way: From Dream to Reality.

At the end of the book is a bibliography and a listing of Tarot related websites.

 

rsz_1rsz_img066

The cards are 2 3/4” by 4 ¾”. The card backs are black, with the geometric design of Metatron’s cube in the center, and are reversible. Mendel describes how she created the image: “I used Metatron’s Cube as a sacred geometric shape of 13 circles that when joined center to center offers 78 paths – that seemed like a perfect diagram for a 78 card deck. The white lines are outlines of kabbalah’s Tree of life.”

The card faces show the mandala for the card suit, with the card number in the center. The image is centered on the card, surrounded by a thin border that carries a specific color for each suit: Wands, Cups, Swords, and Coins.

rsz_img070

The Three of Cups shows three female figures, dressed in pink, extending their arms out to each other. The mantra the Three of Cups is: Celebrate the circle that is unbroken. One of the questions to ask is: With whom do you laugh the longest and the loudest?

rsz_img073

Death shows the image of an hour glass, with the sand running into the bottom. The mantra for Death is: Without expectation, I yield to change and welcome the new. One of the questions to ask is: What do you believe about death?

rsz_img074

Strength shows a dark haired female figure, seated, petting a black panther. The mantra for Strength is: Gentleness is strength, and strength is gentle. One of the questions to ask is: How do you relate to the wild?

rsz_img075

The Hierophant shows a female figure with her head balanced on her hands, surrounded by the petals of a water-lily. The mantra for the Hierophant is: From my heart I listen deeply and completely. One of the questions to ask is: What do listening and love have in common?

rsz_img067

The Emperor shows a male figure holding a clock, a symbol of Chronos and Kairos. The mantra for the Emperor is: I organize the details of the grand scheme. One of the questions to ask is: Are you able to summon The Sacred Warrior within when needed?

rsz_img069

The Ace of Coins shows a six-sided mandala. The mantra for the Ace of Coins is: Manifestation grounds intuitive vision. One of the questions to ask is: Do you value Nature as a teacher?

rsz_img071 (1)

The Seer/Queen of Swords shows a female figure, dressed in blue, seated, holding a sword in her right hand. There is a full moon in the sky behind her. The mantra for the Seer/Queen of Swords is: I balance my time between thinking and being. One of the questions to ask is: Are you a good listener?

rsz_img072

The Ace of Wands shows a magical wand bridging heaven and earth. The mantra for the Ace of Wands is: I celebrate my ability to fulfill my creative vision. One of the questions to ask is: Do you practice “being” as well as “doing”?

I am very impressed with both deck and book. The black background draws me in (as representing a void), and the simplicity of the mandalas and the “clean”, vivid images go a long way to being able to work with this deck. I appreciate the foundation in sacred geometry, and feel that this deck lends itself to readings, personal work, journeying, meditation, and more. The deck is limited only by the imagination/vision of the user. I recommend it as an investment in one’s self.

© April 2016 Bonnie Cehovet
Reproduction prohibited without written permission of hte author.

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on April 18, 2016 in Uncategorized

 

Tarot Pink For Cancer

Tarot Pink For Cancer –
For Inspiration, Empowerment, and Support

Artists: collaboration of 65 Tarot artists
Author: personal interpretation from the artists
Introduction by Mary K. Greer
GameCrafter
2015

IMG_0757

“Tarot Pink For Cancer” is a project under the auspices of Ron Leong and WizardToo, LLC that involved 65 talented artists within the Tarot community that came together and created a Tarot deck to inspire, empower, and support breast cancer awareness, and those going through the breast cancer treatment process. It is meant to be a fund raising tool to benefit breast cancer research.

Under the sponsorship of WizardToo, LLC (the publisher of the Tarot e-cards app), there is a printed deck available through Game Crafter (Tarot Pink For Cancer), and a Tarot app for both iOS and Android mobile devices.

This is a full 78 card deck, accompanied by a 22 page companion booklet, and a bag to store the cards in. (Note: A digital download of the companion booklet is available after purchase.)

In her introduction, Mary Greer (author of “Tarot For Yourself”) talks about the fact that we have all been touched by some form of cancer, or a life-threatening illness, whether it is ourselves, a loved one, a friend, or someone we admire. She refers to it as an emotional, transformative experience for everyone involved.  Greer notes that many of the artists found the experience of creating one or more cards was healing in and of itself. This deck is seen as supporting a healing journey – along these lines, Greer suggests giving the deck to someone that is going through the cancer experience, and then perhaps helping them out with something that they need help with.

Some of the artists are working in remembrance of someone they know, others are cancer survivors themselves. Greer notes that there are no rules for working with this deck – that each individual should use them in the manner that works best for them. She sees the 78 cards of this deck as 78 gifts and prayers for well-being – as indeed they are!

The 22 page companion booklet (which features the card Strength on the cover) includes a small write-up from each artist of what the card means to them. Color scans, including the Queen of Cups, the Eight of Coins, the Seven of Swords, and the Three of Wands are scattered throughout the booklet.

IMG_20151006_0001

The cards are 2 ¾” by 4 ¾”. The backs feature a pink background with white clouds, and a pink lemnescate in the center. The card backs are reversible. The card faces feature a light gray border, with the card name at the top, in black, against a pink strip. The card image is outlined with a thing strip of pink. Under the card we find the artists name, along with a short bio.

Here is some of the incredible work that came out of this project:

IMG_20151006_0010

The Magician (by Ciro Marchetti):

“The Magician represents making best use of personal power and skills. Through concentration and accessing resources, the individual determines the actions they want to take. The books on the shelf represent knowledge from study, the raven speaks to information coming from afar, and the owl speaks to spiritual/intuitive wisdom.”

IMG_20151006_0009

The Fool (by Arnell Ando):

“Fortune visits after misfortune. Allow yourself to be surprised by unusual synchronicities & gentle gestures. Fresh perspective during a challenging time. Revisit a sense of optimism and belief in an inner journey. Look to friends who cherish you. Trust your gut. Don’t forget to reward yourself with spontaneous, unexpected treats when things get overwhelming.”

IMG_20151006_0008

The Page of Swords (by Ash Goh):

“We face challenges on a daily basis. This word means Patience in Chinese which brings to mind the importance of governing our thought processes as we face obstacles that seem insurmountable. “We cannot change the cards we are dealt, just how we lay the hand. Randy Pascal, The Last Lecture.”    

IMG_20151006_0007

The Hanged Man (by Chanel Bayless):

“It’s time to let go of fears and give yourself a moment to reflect on the positives of life. Time is suspended for now. Meditate. Allow your spirit to speak to the universe. You are seeing life from a different perspective. Connect. Accept. Everything is turning around.”

IMG_20151006_0006

The Hierophant (by Sue Silva):

“The Hierophant raises her right hand giving a peace sign that represents blessings to all and especially to ourselves. It is now that we know we hold the keys to our own destiny. We are strong and everything is possible in this life journey.”

 IMG_20151006_0005

The Ace of Wands (by Chris Ernest Paradis):

“When the Ace of Wands appears, your passions have sparked a a creative instinct to manifest new possibilities in your life. You have the tools and energy to do it. It is up to you to overcome your obstacles and allow this spark to become a reality.

IMG_20151006_0004

The Page of Cups (by Paula Millet):

“The Page of Cups brings you messages of love from your circle of family and friends. Their support will carry you through whatever is to come.”

IMG_20151006_0003

The Eight of Swords (by Rhonda Delaune Welch):

“Isolation, self-imposed restrictions, imprisonment, stagnation, confusion. The Eight of Swords represents someone who considers herself trapped and isolated. This card mage shows a woman who has intentionally disengaged from her surroundings, unable or unwilling to see the mental stairway leading up and out of her current situation. Swords, representing her thoughts, impede her from more positive possibilities.”

IMG_20151006_0002

The Four of Cups (by Paula Millet):

“Signifies a time to retreat and reflect upon the choices before you. This is an opportunity to evaluate how you feel about your options and the possible outcomes.”

The journey for this deck was not an easy one – not with 65 artists, each with their own perception and opinions! I was with it all the way, as an observer. I thank everyone involved with this project – especially Mr. Ron Leong, for holding it all together. The end product is a delight to work with, and is definitely the tool of empowerment and healing that it was meant to be!

© October 2015 Bonnie Cehovet

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on October 12, 2015 in Uncategorized

 

Tags: , ,

The Cartomancer – The New Kid In Town

Jadzia holding up cover

There is a new kid on the block in the world of divination – one that promises to spark interest, inform, educate, and share the work that is being done in the fields of Tarot, Lenormand, and Oracle reading. The Cartomancer is a quarterly magazine whose premier edition came out on May 1st, 2015. The magazine can be purchased in both print and e-zine format, and is being brought to us by Devera Publishing (Jay and Jadzia DeForest). I am very honored to have been asked to be on the editorial staff for this publication.

The premier issue included articles by Jay, Jadzia, and myself, along with Jaymi Innowen Elford, Camelia Elias, Pamela Steele, Heather Mendel, and Mellissae Lucia. Great articles on divinatory humor were presented by James Ricklef (“Today I Will Nurture My Inner Demons”), and Pamela Steele (“Good Trade!”). Reviews include Under the Roses Lenormand, Le Tarot Noir, The Burning Serpent Oracle, the Vintage Wisdom Oracle, thte Sacred Mandala Lenormand Oracle, and the Tarot de St. Croix. Featured deck imagery included the Wise Fool Tarot (along with an interview with its creator, Cade Burkhammer), the Magical Realism Tarot, the Portland Tarot, the Egyptian Lenormand, the Rainbow Travellers Tarot, The Syzygy Oracle and SacredMandala, and Jadzia’s Unpublished Majors Deck.

Next publication date is August 1st, 2015. We are looking for submissions for articles, artwork and photography,  reviews, classifieds, and forum.

Note that articles have to be unique and unpublished, and that the Cartomancer has exclusive publication rights for twelve months.

The Cartomancer is a full color, glossy magazine. In my opinion, this is a collectors item. We look forward to submissions from the cartomancy community, and the sharing of experiences as well as art. From the mission statement: “Our goal is to support an inclusive and mutually supportive community of Tarot, Lenormand, and Oracle readers worldwide through a quarterly journal that includes … ” (well written articles, high quality divination art, a marketplace for artists and authors, a public forum for letters and editorials).

We are looking forward to your submissions!

(c) 2015 Bonnie Cehovet
Reproduction prohibited without written permission from the author.

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on May 15, 2015 in Uncategorized

 

Tags: , , , , ,

Review – The Sherlock Holmes Tarot

The Sherlock Holmes Tarot
Wisdom From the First Consulting Detective

Author: John Matthews
Artist: Wil Kinghan
Eddison Sadd
2014
ISBN #978-1-4549-1022-0

Sherlock Holmes Tarot Cover

“I never guess. It is a shocking habit –
destructive to the logical faculty.”

~ The Sign of Four

I have had my eye on this deck, and finally decided that I “had” to have it! I am very pleased with both the artistry and the presentation of the cards. The story of Holmes, Watson, and 221B Baker Street is as I hold it in my mind. If it wasn’t, the deck would have been gifted on. Why keep something that is very important in your life if it doesn’t fit the image that you have of it?

This is a 79 card deck, along traditional lines, with cards retitled to fit the theme of Sherlock Holmes. (Examples include Inspector Lestrade as the Fool (I had to think about that one), The Great Detective as the Magician, and Irene Adler as the High Priestess.) The extra card is listed as a Wild Card (represented by the Giant Rat of Sumatra). The suits are Observation (Swords), with an eye as an icon; Evidence (Wands), with a foot as an icon; Analysis (Cups), with a magnifying glass as an icon; and Deduction (Pentacles), with a question mark as an icon. The Court cards are Baker Street Irregular (Page), Peeler (Knight), Lady (Queen), and Inspector (King).

The deck and 160 page companion book come in a sturdy cardboard box with a lift-off top. The cover shows Holmes and Watson, while the back of the box gives information about the deck.

In their preface, Mathews and Kingham talk about this deck as reflecting the “inner landscape” of Sherlock Holmes. Indeed it does! I dearly love Sherlock Holmes (in my mind as portrayed by Basil Rathbone, with Nigel Bruce as Dr. Watson). In Part One: The Wisdom of Holmes & Watson, we read about Arthur Conan Doyle, the man who imagined Sherlock Holmes and his deductive abilities.  The stories were popular from the very beginning, which is understandable. I have read them all over and over and over again! It was also interesting to read about real individuals that may have been used as prototypes in building the character of Holmes. The authors pose the question of whether Holmes himself would have approved of the Tarot, and come up with some interesting conclusions! In this deck we see the wisdom of Sherlock Holmes applied through the Tarot – IMHO to great advantage!

In Part Two: The Greater Mystery – The cards and their meanings, the game is literally afoot! This section starts out with a listing of renamed titles for the Major Arcana, the retitled suits and Court cards, and the icons that represent each suit. Each card is represented by a black and white image, The Game (a summary of the meaning of the card), The Fog (reversed meanings), Keys (shorter meanings), and Holmesian Wisdom (quotes from the Sherlock Holmes canon). Note: I love that the Holmesian Wisdom quotes are presented within the circle of a magnifying glass!

In Part Three: The Art of Investigation – working with the cards, the authors talk about what each of the suits does, and using the Wild Card. Spreads include the four card Lens Spread, the eight card Great Detective Spread, and the nine card Enquiry Spread. Several pages are left blank at the end of the book for notes and observations.

The Major Arcana depict figures and locations from the Sherlock Holmes stories, while the Minor Arcana depict scenes from specific stories. (It was a joy to go through this deck for the first time, and recognize so many people and scenes!)  I was also impressed with the representation of the Victorian era, of which I am a huge fan.

The artwork brought the theme together in a wonderful fashion – one could believe they were in the Victoria era, even if only for a short while. The high hats, candles, and gas lamps, along with foggy streets, tell the story. Tarot aficionados will be happy to note that Caitlin Matthews graciously agreed to pose for some of the cards in this deck!

Sherlock Holmes Tarot_0001

The cards are 2 7/8” by 4 7/8”. The backs are gold, with 221B back to back in the middle of the card. (We all know who lived at 221B Baker Street!) The card faces show a ¼” white border, surrounding the card image. The card number and title is across the top of the card, in black lettering against a gold background. The Minor Arcana show the card number or title, but not the suit. Suits are indicated by icons placed in the upper right and left hand corners of the card.

Sherlock Holmes Tarot_0002

I am still not used to Inspector Lestrade as the Fool … but I am getting there. Here we see Lestrade, in a brown overcoat  and hat, facing away from us. He looks to be on the docks, gun in his right hand, lantern in his left hand. Holmesian Wisdom is “I take a shortcut when I can get it.”

Sherlock Holmes Tarot_0003

The Great Detective shows Holmes sitting in a chair, facing the reader, his hands in a “V” in front of him, his legs crossed. On the table in front of him is a lit candle, books, and other items of detection. He appears pensive, as only Sherlock Holmes can appear. Holmesian Wisdom is “A conjurer gets no credit once he explains his trick.”

Sherlock Holmes Tarot_0004

Irene Adler shows a young woman seated, in what appears to be a restaurant or tea shop. She is dressed for public with a hat, and is seated next to a table with a teapot and teacup. In the background we see both men and women standing. The Holmesian Wisdom is “Woman are naturally secretive, and they like to do their own secreting.”

Sherlock Holmes Tarot_0005

The Three of Observation (Swords) features Holmes in a fit of depression, standing at the window looking out at the London fog, newspapers in front of him. The Holmesian Wisdom is “The most difficult crime to track is the one that is purposeless.”

Sherlock Holmes Tarot_0006

The Baker Street Irregular of Observation (Page of Swords) shows an envelope coming in through the mail slot in a door. The slot is open, and we see a pair of eyes looking through it. The Holmesian Wisdom is “They can go everywhere, see everything, overhear everyone.”

Sherlock Holmes Tarot_0007

The Five of Evidence (Wands) shows a candlelit room, with Holmes standing in the background, in a dark overcoat and hat. Holmes is seen subduing a red headed man. The Holmesian Wisdom is “I know my dear Watson that you share my love of all that is bizarre.”

Sherlock Holmes Tarot_0008

The Ace of Analysis (Cups) shows Holmes sitting in the middle of a candlelit room, wearing an overcoat and hat, and smoking his pipe. Papers are strewn all around him. The Holmesian Wisdom is “I can only see two things for certain. It’s the chain between them we are going to have to trace.”

Sherlock Holmes

The Lady of Deduction (Queen of Pentacles) shows Mrs. Hudson standing in front of a red door, holding a tea tray. The Holmsian Wisdom is “I do not encourage visitors.”

Sherlock Holmes Tarot_0009

The Peeler of Deduction (Knight of Pentacles) shows a constable, crouched over a body in a library. Next to the body we see a fallen notebook, and a small wooden box that has broken open. The Holmesian Wisdom is “Each fact is suggestive in itself. Together they have a cumulative force.”

This is not a learning deck – but it is a deck that would be thoroughly enjoyed by someone that likes themed decks, and/or someone that loves Sherlockian lore.

© 2000 – 2015 Bonnie Cehovet
Reproduction prohibited without written permission of the author.

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on January 9, 2015 in Uncategorized

 

Tags: , ,

Review – The Alice Tarot

The Alice Tarot

Author: Karen Mahony
Designed by: Alexandr Ukolov and Karen Mahony
Illustrated by: Alexandr Ukolov
Magic Realist Press
2014

rsz_1rsz_img_0514

“The Alice Tarot” has been on my desk since it arrived … and it will stay there, along with Ciro Marchetti’s “Oracle of Visions”, and my reading deck, the “Morgan-Greer Tarot”. It is always nice to have a choice in the cards one wishes to work with!

This is a traditional, 78 card deck, following the structure of the Rider-Waite-Smith Tarot. This gives it form, a form within which we are encouraged to play, and expand our wisdom. It is certainly not a Rider-Waite clone. Oh, no … it has wisdom and imagery of its own, based on the Alice books (written by Lewis Carroll), and the creator’s desire to merge the enchantment of Alice with the magic of Tarot. The intention of this deck is to allow the reader to “go down the rabbit hole”, and see what they will find. This can be a strange, surreal world, one in which imagination is allowed to run rampant, and understanding comes in leaps and bounds. The deck is accompanied by a 40 page LWB. (Note, there is a larger, more definitive book available for purchase separately.) The cards and LWB come in a beautifully decorated, heavy cardboard box.

The card titles follow the traditional structure, with the suites being Wands, Cups, Swords, and Coins. Strength is VIII, Justice is XI. The court cards are Page, Knight, Queen, and King.

The LWB offer several spreads: a five card “Down The Rabbit Hole”, a four card “The Caucus Race”, a four card “The Tea Party”, and a five card “My Own Wonderland”.

For the Major Arcana, the creators matched the classic attributes of each Major Arcana card with scenes and characters from the Alice stories.

Each card is presented with what the energy is, keywords, and Alice meanings. For example:

The Hermit

The Mock Turtle

 A deep spiritual or philosophical thinker*Taking time out on your own to consider the deeper questions of life* Cutting yourself off from others because you need a space to think clearly* Stepping aside from the business of everyday life in order to develop your spiritual side*Loneliness

Alice Meanings

An injustice*someone who pretends to be fair, but isn’t*Watch out! Don’t trust someone who is telling you what to do*A “cat and mouse” game … being lured into something under false pretenses

The cards are 3” by 5”, with a reversible blue and white floral background featuring two rabbits. The card faces show a ¼” white border surrounding the central image, with the card title in black letters against a white background along the bottom of the deck. The Major Arcana show title only – no numbers. The coloring is intense, with beautiful cold stamping on each of the cards that gives areas within the cards an iridescent look as the light catches them.

 IMG_0001_NEW

The High Priestess portrays Alice going through the Looking Glass. Alice meanings include going into another world, or finding another way of thinking in this world.

 IMG_0002_NEW

The Hanged Man features the Cheshire Cat. Alice meanings include giving yourself up to a joyous madness, and advice from someone who is perceptive and also, perhaps, somewhat irresponsible.

 IMG_0003_NEW

The Queen of Wands is the chess Red Queen. Alice meanings include someone who is always in a rush, and warm sexuality.

 IMG_0004_NEW

The King of Coins is the chess White King. Alice meanings include someone who thinks he is more practical than he is, and a kindly but ineffective man.

 IMG_0005

The Six of Wands shows the characters turning into cards as Alice wakes up. Alice meanings include realizing that a threat has no real substance, and refusing to be intimidated.

 IMG_0006_NEW

The Four of Swords shows the Dormouse sleeping. Alice meanings include calm amidst chaos, and sleep and dreaming.

 IMG_0007

The Ten of Coins shows the Mad Hatter juggling cakes. Alice meanings include having it all, and having fun with it, and a playful exuberance.

 IMG_0008

The Two of Wands shows Alice finally getting into the Wonderland garden. Alice meanings include seeing clearly where you want to go next, and longing to get to a better place.

“The Alice Tarot” is a rabbit hole that you will not regret going down!

 © 2014 Bonnie Cehovet

Reproduction prohibited without written permission of the author.

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on October 9, 2014 in Uncategorized