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The World of Magazines

magazines cover

What do magazines have to tell us? What place do they serve in our lives? There are all kinds of magazines, from the very, very general to the very, very specific. Today I am going to talk about magazines that focus on the world of divination – specifically Tarot, Lenormand, and oracle decks. We are going to look at two publications – The Cartomancer, a print quarterly that will have its birth into the real world in January of 2015, and Attune Magazine, a digital quarterly that has been with us for some time now.

The Cartomancer

The Cartomancer is a print quarterly, founded by Jadzia and Jay DeForest (Devera Publishing). The focus is on Tarot, the Lenormand, and oracle decks. The magazine will include articles, columns, book and deck reviews, art, advertising, and more. In a sense of transparency, I need to tell you that I am on the editorial staff. I will be contributing to the magazine, and I encourage all of you that have something to offer to submit your work too! You can also advertise your work here, which I think is a huge bonus, as the magazine is targeted to a specific audience. I am looking forward to seeing how well this magazine does. For more information, here is the link to The Cartomancer website. There is also a Facebook group that can be found here.

Atune Magazne cover

Attune Magazine is a digital quarterly founded by Mary Nale and Bill Back. The focus is on Tarot, the Lenormand, and oracle decks, as well as other things within the world of divination. The magazine includes articles, columns, book and deck reviews, poetry, videos, advertising, and more. Attune Magazine is also targeted to a specific audience, so advertising here is a bonus for your work. This magazine just keeps getting better and better! or more information, here is the ink to Attune Magazine. They also have a Facebook group which can be found here.

So, why exactly do I find magazines interesting, if not essential? Magazines put in one small space a lot of information on defined topics. I subscribe to fashion magazines, to financial magazines, to whatever magazines ill in the niche where I feel that I need information. I like the mix of text and images in magazines, and the articles are (usually) of a length where I can read  them in one sitting. I have gotten a tremendous amount of ideas from magazines – they have expanded my thinking, and my world. With these two specific magazines, we have the opportunity to express ourselves, and to grow both personally and professionally. I hope that you take the time to check them both out!

(c) 2000 – 2014 Bonnie Cehovet

Reproduction prohibited without the written permission of the author.

 
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Posted by on December 5, 2014 in non-Tarot divination, Tarot

 

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Tarot – The Good, The Bad, And The Ugly

professionalism

Those who are reading this will most likely be, like me, someone who walks in the world of Tarot. Like any world (professional or non-professional), it has its issues. Lately I have seen more than a few of the shadow sides of Tarot. Cyber bullying, poor business practices, posts on social media sites that are major rants, and that draw commentary that just adds fuel to the fire.

There are real issues out there – people who are known bullies, people who throw their weight around without thought of the consequences, and people that want to out those that connect professionally with less than stellar individuals/organizations.

I don’t think we gain anything in flame wars. We spend way too much time either attacking someone, outing someone, or defending either ourselves, or someone else. There are worlds within worlds in the Tarot community, and we all need to recognize that. Some of the people in those worlds are professionals, some are there to add the study of Tarot to their life skills. We all need to respect each other.

Taking responsibility for ourselves – for what we say, and for our actions – is of paramount importance. Recognize that in the real world we are who we are, but we are also who we associate with. Agreeing to work with a person or organization has consequences. You may view it as a limited connection, perhaps for a specific project. Other people may view it as you aligning yourself with the person or organization that you are working with.

The consequences of working with an individual or organization that is perceived poorly can be far reaching. Your reputation is at stake here, as well as your ability to earn a living. You could very well be boycotted.

Before you decide to enter a project of any kind, take a close look at who you will be working with, and how they are perceived. Use Google to check out everything that you can. Quietly (as in a pm, not a public post) query friends and business acquaintances about any dealings they may have had with the individual or organization. Ask their opinion about what you are considering doing. The decision is yours in the end, but it needs to be an informed decision.

In my opinion, while someone’s work does represent them, so do their actions, and the actions of those they associate with. There are people in the Tarot world that I will not associate with, that I will not work with. I don’t find the need to announce it, but I do feel better for it. I have to look in the mirror every morning, and I don’t want to have any questions about who I am, where I am headed, or what mask I am wearing.

Let’s be real, let’s be transparent, and let’s support each other in an authentic manner.

 © 2000 – 2014 Bonnie Cehovet
Reproduction prohibited without the written permission of the author.

 
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Posted by on November 20, 2014 in Tarot

 

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Review – The Tarot Readers Companion

The Tarot Reading Companion

Author: Thirteen
Aeclectic Tarot
2014
ISBN #978-0-9871104-6-6

 Tarot Reading Companion cover

The Tarot Reading Companion is exactly that – a companion on your journey of Tarot reading. Included are both upright and reversed meanings for all 78 cards, instructions on how to read the cards, sample spreads (including one card readings, past/preset/future readings, relationship readings, and the Horseshoe Spread), and a resource guide.

Note: The Tarot card images in this e-book are from the Sacred Isle Tarot, by David Higgins.

The book starts out by noting that the best way to use it is to take in what seems important to you personally. In other words, start wherever you want to start, and go from there. This encourages Tarot students of all levels to make best use of this material. Perhaps you are a beginner, unfamiliar with how to do a reading, and unfamiliar with the card meanings. There is a section on how to read, and sections on both the upright and reversed card meanings. Perhaps you want to go straight to the reversed meanings, or you want to check out the templates for a diverse group of spreads. Or perhaps you want to check out the Tarot resources section. There is no one way to work with this book!

The card meanings are basic meanings, meant to be built upon as you continue your work with the Tarot. It is suggested that the cards have a range of meanings, rather than one specific meaning. The student is encouraged to trust their intuition, and proceed with their studies at their own pace.

Each card is presented with a beautiful, full color illustration, a listing of the common symbols, the basic story, the basic meaning of the card, and Thirteen’s observations about the card.

For The Fool, the common symbols are listed as the Fool in colorful motley, the pack tied to a staff, a small dog, and a cliff. The basic story talks about the journey that the Fool is on. The basic meaning of the card is one of infinite possibilities. In Thirteen’s observations of the Fool, she talks about the Fool ultimately standing for new beginnings, with the Fool representing the querent. The Fool can also be naive, or overly optimistic.

In the section on reading the cards, Thirteen talks about reading with and without a spread, specific card positions within a spread, sequences and patterns, and using the right spread. She then addresses asking the right question, and how Yes/No questions can be limiting. “How”, “What”, and “Why” questions tend to open things up a bit more.

I love that Thirteen addresses doing the same reading over and over again! I feel the same way that she does … you will annoy your cards big time! She also makes the very astute observation that it is best to wait to read for others until you have a good understanding of the card meanings, and feel comfortable working with them.

She also notes that the Tarot reader’s job is to deliver the Tarot’s answer to the querent’s question, not the reader’s answer. Certainly our own perception can act as a filter for interpreting the cards, but the reader really needs to get out of their own way and deliver the message within the cards, the message that spirit wants delivered. Thirteen advises that the reader trust their instincts, and trust their cards. She notes that the cards show the future that the querent is creating for themselves.

Each spread is presented with a sample reading – which is accompanied by full color images of the cards drawn. The deck used, the Sacred Isle Tarot, is absolutely gorgeous!

Under reading reversals, Thirteen notes that three of the most common ways to read them are opposite (the opposite energy to the upright meaning), blockage (the energy of the card is blocked or diminished), and upside-down image.

The resource guide includes asking Thirteen questions on the Aeclectic Tarot Forum, suggested decks to use with this book, and sending feedback to Aeclectic Tarot about the book.

I found this to be an easy to use reference book that covers the basics, and will open the door to anyone who wants to learn to read the Tarot.

 © 2000 – 2014 Bonnie Cehovet
Reproduction prohibited without permission of he author.

 
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Posted by on November 18, 2014 in Tarot

 

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Review – Tarot Lovers’ Calendar 2015

Tarot Lovers’ Calendar 2015

Creator: Major Tom Schick
Artists: varied
Independently Published
2014

Tarot Lovers' Calendar 2015 cover

Where to begin … there is nothing that I don’t like about this calendar! I appreciate the size (8.5″ by 11″), the fact that it is spiral bound (ease of use), the fact that it is Tarot themed, and the fact that it highlights different artists every year. Yes, I have followed this deck for years! (It has been available in limited edition for 14 years running!) The quality and intent of the creator, Major Tom Schick, is matched toe to toe by the distributor, Devera Publishing.

This is a highly usable calendar, as well as being a collectible. Every year that I have purchased this deck, I have kept it – this is art presented in a quality format.

This year’s artists include Blue Gene (Astral Scion Tarot),Taylor Ellis (The Ellis Deck), Aquarius Wellbeing (Irish Lenormand), M. M. Meleen (Tabula Mundi Tarot), Heather Mendel (The Syzygy Oracle), Lisa de St, Croix (Tarot de St. Croix), Katrina Wynne (Katrina’s Personal Petite Lenormand), Beth Seilonen (The Compound Tarot),Rachel Paul (The Dark Carnival Tarot), Fionan Benjamin & Nghia Hoang (Lux Ferous Tarot), Eleanor Boyce (The Singing Serpent Tarot), and Gaby Merman (The FaYth Tarot).

Information printed on the calendar includes Full Moon, Last Quarter Moon, New Moon, and First Quarter Moon, as well as dates for meteor showers. The days of the week are listed straight across – Sunday through Saturday, with enough room to make notes for the day. (If you keep your calendars, you then have a collectible history of Tarot artists, and a personal living history through your notes). Also included are the artists name, the name of the deck, when it will become available, and where to find it.

Each deck represented includes full color images, along with a short write-up from the artist. I really liked this, because it allows us to take a short journey into the mindset of the artist, and the creation process for their deck. For example, Blue Gene talks about putting his thoughts about a deck into action when he decided to join the Tarot Deck Creators Facebook group. We find that Taylor Ellis was influenced by David Palladini’s “Aquarian Tarot”, and that Heather Mendel brings together Tarot, Kabbalah, and the Hebrew alphabet to honor the Sacred Feminine.

Among my favorite images is the IV of Pentacles (Blue Gene, Astral Scion Tarot), which features a male figure, in a business suit and bright red tie, pointing out from the card. I also loved the simplicity of Key (Lynn Boyle, The Irish Lenormand), and Reflecting (Heather Mendel, The Syzygy Oracle), which features a beautiful spiders web. Both of the very colorful images from the Dark Carnival Tarot (Rachel Paul) brought a smile to my face!

Some of these decks I have seen on the Internet, some I have in hand, and some are now on my wish list! An incredible journey into art and divination, for a very small price of admission!

 © 2000 – 2015 Bonnie Cehovet

 
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Posted by on November 8, 2014 in Tarot

 

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To App Or Not To App

“To App or Not To App, that is the question”
Shakespeare revised!

Many thanks to Ron Leong (Tarot eCards) for sharing Shakespeare revised and this recurring question! Apps play a huge role in our digital world and have expanded our capabilities to a phenomenal degree. Unfortunately, the Tarot world has not exactly embraced Tarot apps. IMHO, that is a shame since Tarot apps can expand the use and popularity of Tarot. The same people who question why there is a need for more than one Tarot deck, question why there is a need for more than one Tarot app (if they have checked out Tarot apps at all).

Personally, I am an advocate of Tarot apps. I was, shall we say, not quite ready to upgrade my cell, when I came to the conclusion that I needed to do so to investigate the world of Tarot apps. (And other app worlds – my airline boarding passes are now held on my iPhone!) I found a whole new world out there … one that could travel with me!

I discovered different Tarot apps will offer different things. You will see card meanings, various card spreads, the ability to create your own card spread, journaling your readings, the ability to e-mail readings, and at times a link to purchase a given deck. How much or how little you choose to use of each apps capabilities is up to you.

And technology advances are continually being applied to upgrade our Tarot experience. Tarot eCards has created an innovative and unique multi-deck Tarot app where a single app works with all their decks. Their app even allows the user to change and enlarge the type size for better readability, and to magnify the images for selective studying.

Karyn Easton of Paranormality.com (along with David Wong) has developed a series of apps for her deck,the Tarot Lovers’ Tarot. This includes “Discover”, which works with Tarot card meanings; “Combine”, which works with Tarot card combinations; “Challenge”, which tests Tarot knowledge; and “Reveal”, which shows your destiny through the Tarot.

I am pleased to see that many of my favorite decks, including the Tarot of the Holy Light, the Shadowscapes Tarot, the Paulina Tarot, the Gaian Tarot, the Hezicos Tarot, the Whispering Tarot, and the Tarot of Ceremonial Magick are available in  a digital version as an app.

You have my views from the point of an end user. I would like to offer you another perspective on Tarot apps, from the point of view of an app developer – Mr. Ron Leong, of  TaroteCards.com. Ron believes that Tarot apps are an enabling technology that can enhance the Tarot user experience  and expand the popularity of Tarot. The apps make Tarot convenient to carry around and acquire, easily accessible anytime and anywhere, easy to use and less costly. Apps can bring to the Tarot community out-of-print decks, limited edition titles, and new decks without the expense, hassle and distribution hurdles of printed decks. The Tarot world needs to recognize that apps are a great complement to the printed version, not a replacement. The decision to use apps need not be viewed as an either/or decision but both formats can coexist the way digital music, movies and books exist with the “physical” versions.

You can even try out the Tarot eCards App Free which can be downloaded at www.appstore.com/TaroteCards – it includes a free copy of RWS2.0 Rider-Waite-Smith Tarot. Only available for the iPhone and iPad but an Android version will be released soon.

My reviews on the Tarot app world can be found here – http://theworldoftarot.wordpress.com/2013/09/15/review-tarot-ecards-app/, http://paranormality.com/. For reviews on specific deck apps, go to my site, bonniecehovet.com.

A listing of Tarot card app providers can be found here – Tarot On The Go.

This list, of course, does not include all of the Tarot apps available. To see if a deck that you might be interested in has an app that you can work with, just Google the name of the deck, followed by the word “app”. Magic via the Internet!

The holidays are coming up … this is the first in a series of blogs focusing on what is available in the Tarot world for holiday gifting. I hope that you at least check out the world of Tarot apps … it is a fascinating and empowering world!

Additional Blogs:

Tarot Books: http://bonniecehovet.wordpress.com/2014/11/06/time-to-think-holiday-shopping/

Tarot Decks: http://bonniecehovet.wordpress.com/2014/11/12/time-to-think-about-holiday-shopping-part-2/

 © 2000 – 2014 Bonnie Cehovet
Reproduction prohibited without the written permission of the author.

 

 

 
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Posted by on November 1, 2014 in Tarot

 

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Review – Tarot For Cats

Tarot For Cats -
Unlock the Mysteries of Your Nine Lives

Author: Regen Dennis
Artist: Kipling West
MacMillan
1996

 Tarot For Cats cover

I was very excited when my friend Jamie Morris gifted me with this deck. I love the Tarot, I love cats (I have three male cats at present), and I love the two combined. The cards and 68 page companion book come in a lovely box where they can be pulled out of the side. The front of the box features what appears to be an orange tabby as High Priestess, while the back of the box features Magoo, a young orange shorthair that is doing his own reading to find out what awaits him at the Spay & Neuter Clinic! He drew the Tower, the Lovers, and Strength. All will be well, Magoo!

The companion book is smaller than normal (approximately 5 3/8” by 5”. The background color is a beautiful lavender, with the image of the High Priestess on the front, and the card back on the back. I love the small size… as if it contains lots of secrets! The book begins with a short history of the Tarot, a synopsis of the cards, and a short take on how to use the Tarot.

Each card is presented over two pages with a small full color image, what the card represents, the symbolism in the card, the card meanings, and what the card is as your Key Card. The meanings section of each card carries a bonus for cat lovers – a small image of different types of cats.

In the readings section at the back of the book, we see information on spreads, the question, and readings themselves. The creators of this deck offer unique spreads based around cats, each spread accompanied by a full color image. The spreads are: Bird and Pounce, Food Bowl, Pawprint, and Catnip Cross. Each spread includes a reading done for a cat. How cool is this!

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The cards are approximately 3 ¼” by 5 ¼”. The backs show a ¼” white border, surrounding a deep blue background with lighter blue imagery. In the center of the card are two cats, done in blue, looking out at the reader. The cards are reversible.

The card faces show a white border, with the card title at the bottom, in black lettering against a gold background. The art style is very clean and uncluttered (similar to the Halloween Tarot, which was also done by Kipling West). Almost hidden images in the cards are a delight – the green snake in the Wheel of Fortune, the roses and lilies on the window in the Hierophant, the globe in the Emperor, the ankh, lilies, and butterfly in Death.

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One of my favorite cards is the Empress. Here we see a beautiful white mother cat (Chinchilla), laying on a chair with her litter of kittens. Amongst the meaning are that of being creative, clever, and unique. As a Key Card, the Empress indicates that you have surrounded yourself with comfort, and that your domestic situation is secure.

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The Hermit shows a yellow cat (Asian Longhair) sitting on top of a stack of books, with a small black kitten in front of her. The front of the chest next to the cats shows a prominent lock. The Hermit is said to represent he search for truth and wisdom. As a Key Card, it is indicated that you are wise and understand the practicalities of life.

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The Magician shows a white cat (Turkish Van) on a sidewalk, with the sun and moon above him. He is surrounded by flowers, and various items on the sidewalk, including a mouse (earth), fish (water), box of matches (fire), and feather (air). In the grass in front of him we see a snake devouring its tail (the symbol for eternity).

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The Fool shows a yellow cat poised to leap off of a steep cliff after a red bird.  There is a rising sun in the background. This card is all about big change. As a Key Card, it indicates that the individual is creative, and often a trickster.
For me, there is a very “feel good” nature to this deck – it is a deck that I will pull out in difficult times.

© 2000 – 2014 Bonnie Cehovet
Reproduction prohibited without written authorization from the author.

 
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Posted by on October 10, 2014 in Tarot

 

Review – The Alice Tarot

The Alice Tarot

Author: Karen Mahony
Designed by: Alexandr Ukolov and Karen Mahony
Illustrated by: Alexandr Ukolov
Magic Realist Press
2014

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“The Alice Tarot” has been on my desk since it arrived … and it will stay there, along with Ciro Marchetti’s “Oracle of Visions”, and my reading deck, the “Morgan-Greer Tarot”. It is always nice to have a choice in the cards one wishes to work with!

This is a traditional, 78 card deck, following the structure of the Rider-Waite-Smith Tarot. This gives it form, a form within which we are encouraged to play, and expand our wisdom. It is certainly not a Rider-Waite clone. Oh, no … it has wisdom and imagery of its own, based on the Alice books (written by Lewis Carroll), and the creator’s desire to merge the enchantment of Alice with the magic of Tarot. The intention of this deck is to allow the reader to “go down the rabbit hole”, and see what they will find. This can be a strange, surreal world, one in which imagination is allowed to run rampant, and understanding comes in leaps and bounds. The deck is accompanied by a 40 page LWB. (Note, there is a larger, more definitive book available for purchase separately.) The cards and LWB come in a beautifully decorated, heavy cardboard box.

The card titles follow the traditional structure, with the suites being Wands, Cups, Swords, and Coins. Strength is VIII, Justice is XI. The court cards are Page, Knight, Queen, and King.

The LWB offer several spreads: a five card “Down The Rabbit Hole”, a four card “The Caucus Race”, a four card “The Tea Party”, and a five card “My Own Wonderland”.

For the Major Arcana, the creators matched the classic attributes of each Major Arcana card with scenes and characters from the Alice stories.

Each card is presented with what the energy is, keywords, and Alice meanings. For example:

The Hermit

The Mock Turtle

 A deep spiritual or philosophical thinker*Taking time out on your own to consider the deeper questions of life* Cutting yourself off from others because you need a space to think clearly* Stepping aside from the business of everyday life in order to develop your spiritual side*Loneliness

Alice Meanings

An injustice*someone who pretends to be fair, but isn’t*Watch out! Don’t trust someone who is telling you what to do*A “cat and mouse” game … being lured into something under false pretenses

The cards are 3” by 5”, with a reversible blue and white floral background featuring two rabbits. The card faces show a ¼” white border surrounding the central image, with the card title in black letters against a white background along the bottom of the deck. The Major Arcana show title only – no numbers. The coloring is intense, with beautiful cold stamping on each of the cards that gives areas within the cards an iridescent look as the light catches them.

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The High Priestess portrays Alice going through the Looking Glass. Alice meanings include going into another world, or finding another way of thinking in this world.

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The Hanged Man features the Cheshire Cat. Alice meanings include giving yourself up to a joyous madness, and advice from someone who is perceptive and also, perhaps, somewhat irresponsible.

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The Queen of Wands is the chess Red Queen. Alice meanings include someone who is always in a rush, and warm sexuality.

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The King of Coins is the chess White King. Alice meanings include someone who thinks he is more practical than he is, and a kindly but ineffective man.

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The Six of Wands shows the characters turning into cards as Alice wakes up. Alice meanings include realizing that a threat has no real substance, and refusing to be intimidated.

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The Four of Swords shows the Dormouse sleeping. Alice meanings include calm amidst chaos, and sleep and dreaming.

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The Ten of Coins shows the Mad Hatter juggling cakes. Alice meanings include having it all, and having fun with it, and a playful exuberance.

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The Two of Wands shows Alice finally getting into the Wonderland garden. Alice meanings include seeing clearly where you want to go next, and longing to get to a better place.

“The Alice Tarot” is a rabbit hole that you will not regret going down!

 © 2014 Bonnie Cehovet

Reproduction prohibited without written permission of the author.

 
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Posted by on October 9, 2014 in Uncategorized

 
 
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