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Monthly Archives: June 2013

Review – The Dream Raven Tarot

Dream Raven Tarot

Author: Beth Seilonen
Artist: Beth Seilonen
Schiffer Publishing, Ltd.
2013
ISBN #978-0-7643-4361-2

Dream Raven Tarot Box

The “Dream Raven Tarot” is a traditional 78 card Tarot deck, with a 128 page guidebook. Traditional titles are used for the Major Arcana, with Strength at VIII and Justice at XI. The Minor Arcana suit titles are Wands, Cups, Swords, and Pentacles, with the Court Card titles being Page, Knight, Queen, and King. The cards and guidebook come in a hard cardboard box with the trademark Schiffer magnetic lid. The cover of the book shows the Ten of Cups, while the cover of the box shows the Star.

The theme for this deck is that of the Raven being seen as a carrier of messages through dreams …messages for the soul. The messages in this deck are brought by ravens of all types, ready to assist the reader with their personal growth and inner reflection. The strength of this deck lies in its beautiful artwork, and the vibrant colors that were used. Therein lies my problem with this deck … Edgar Allen Poe and I see ravens as beautiful black birds, not the colorful images that we see here do not match up with that.

In her introduction to the 128 page guidebook, Seilonen talks about the purpose of this deck, which is to inspire people to acknowledge the dreams that are deep within their psyche, and then to bring the dreams into conscious thought, so that they can be seen in the light of reality.

Ravens were used to give the deck identity after Seilonen observed them in their habitat in rural Maine, doing things like standing by the side of the road with a very Emperor like expression, waiting for the right opportunity to snatch a shiny object without drawing undo attention to himself from the other birds. The ravens are designed so as to inspire the creative spark through their bright colors and flowing lines. They are there to help you recall dreams of the past, congratulate you as you move along your life’s path, and help you celebrate your successes.

The cards are presented with a black and white scan, a description of the card, the card’s focus, and upright and reversed meanings. The Major Arcana shows a full page scan, while the Minor Arcana Pips and Court Cards vary – most cards show a half-page round scan, the Ten of Swords, the Knight of Cups,  the Two and Five of Pentacles show a small circular scan in the middle of the page, while the King and Queen of Swords, and the King and Queen of Pentacles show a full page scan. The Page of Cups and the Ace, Three and Four of Pentacles show no scan at all.

At the end of the book two unique spreads are presented: Raven’s Claw, a four card spread, and The Raven, a six card spread.

RDT back

The imagery in each suit is keyed to match the suit element (Wands/Fire, Cups/Water, Swords/Air, Pentacles/Earth. The bright colors are meant to enhance the card’s message. The cards are approximately 3 ½” by 5 5/8”, of sturdy, glossy card stock. The card backs show a ¼” white border, surrounding two ravens in flight, facing each other, against a purple background.  The card backs are reversible.

The card faces show a ¼” white border, with the card title across the bottom.  The Major Arcana shows the card title, with no number. The Minor Arcana Pips (numbered cards) show the card number (in text) and the suit, while the Court Cards show the card title and suit. The coloring is watercolor, done in pastels, with the major figure or figures on each card being a raven. The birds are shown in profile, so that we are seeing only one eye. Because of the coloring, this comes across as a gentle deck. My preference would have been to stay true to the color of the raven, which is black. The use of color may take the reader deeper into the card, but for me it stands in the way. I would use this deck as a compliment to another deck when doing a reading, but would not use it as a primary deck.

© 2000 – 2013 Bonnie Cehovet

Reproduction prohibited in any venue without the written permission of the author.

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Posted by on June 23, 2013 in Tarot

 

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Summer Solstice 2013

The Summer Solstice is here … the longest day of the year! Already! I cannot believe this year is going by so fast. Many blessings, many lessons learned, and, for the most part, life is moving along nicely. The Summer Solstice literally marks the beginning of summer … which we really haven’t seen too much of this year in the Pacific Northwest. We are still seeing a bit of rain, cooler weather, and a few days with strong winds.

This year is a special solstice, because on Sunday (6/23) we have a Full Moon in Capricorn that is also a super moon, meaning that the moon will be the closest to earth that it will be this year. Incredible energy there! It is entirely coincidental, but the energies do work together (IMHO, anyway).

We celebrate the potential of the harvest during the summer Solstice, as it is a turning point in the growing season … seeds  have been sown, and nourished, now the young sprouts are full fledged plants.

What do we want to do at this time? Honor the season as a point on the wheel of life. It marks time for us, and allows us a handle on where we are in our year. Enjoy the outdoors, enjoy the fruits and vegetables, enjoy the beautiful flowers, enjoy the life that was born in the spring and is now maturing (as in both farm animals and wild life). In a nutshell – enjoy your life, and celebrate life! Invite neighbors over … have a bar-b-que, go on a picnic, connect with mother earth.

I wanted to do a spread for the Summer Solstice – the template for the one I am using here (Bodrun’s Summer Solstice Tarot Spread) can be found here – http://www.tarotforum.net/showpost.php?p=545852&postcount=2. The author is BodhiSeed on Aeclectic Tarot.

1

4          Sun      2

3

Note: Place the Sun from whatever deck you are using face up in the middle of the spread, then place the other cards around it.

1. During the Summer Solstice, the longest day of the year, more light is available to us. What in my life has been in shadow, that I need to shine a bright light on so I can see it clearly for what it is?

2. The word “solstice” comes from the Latin “sol” (meaning sun) and “sistere” (meaning to cause to stand still). What in my life am I trying to force into happening when instead I need to be still and patient?

3. The Summer Solstice is often called “Midsummer” because it is roughly in the middle of the growing season. What in my life is fertile and productive now? Where are my opportunities for growth?

4. After Summer Solstice, the days gradually become shorter, and the sun’s strength wanes as winter approaches. What is waning in my life? What do I need to release?

TT Fice of Coins

 

 

TT The World

I drew the following cards from the “Touchstone Tarot:

1. Five of Coins

2. Four of Coins

3. The World

4.Knight of Cups

My shadow: Inability to get past my ego, to accept help. It is much easier for me to give than to receive.

What in my life am I trying to force into happening? Material success … financial stability. I am afraid of success.

What in my life is fertile and productive right now? Where are my opportunities for growth? Incredible! What is productive in my life right now is that I am productive … I have put in the work, and now it is paying off! My opportunities for growth are in my ability to accept my success.

What do I need to release from my life? Feedback on this one appreciated. The way I read this card is perhaps what I want to read into it. I need to release the fantasy of the Knight in shining armor, know that he is real, and actively pursue him. (LOL Okay – am I living in fantasy land here!)

TT Happy Squirrel

Wishing you all a wonderful Summer Solstice!

“Touchstone Tarot” by Kat Black, 2009, Konati Press.

© 2000 – 2013 Bonnie Cehovet

Reproduction in any venue prohibited withour written permission of the author,

 
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Posted by on June 22, 2013 in Tarot

 

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Review – The Healing Tarot

The Healing Tarot –

78 Ways To Wellness

Author: Juno Lucina
Artist: Monica Knighton
Schiffer Publishing
2013
ISBN #978-0-7643-3771-6

The Healing Tarot Cover

“The Healing Tarot” is a traditional 78 card deck, using traditional titles for the Major Arcana, with Strength at VIII, and Justice at XI. The suits are Wands, Cups, Swords, and Pentacles, with the Court Cards entitled King, Queen, Knight, and Page.

The foundation for this deck, or the focus, if you will, is on health and healing. The cards are viewed through the perspectives of Astrology, Qaballa, Archetypes, and traditional Tarot meanings. Through the cards the author addresses health, diet, fitness, and overall wellness. The Tarot, then, is essentially a tool for holistic healing.

“How then do we heal?” That is what this deck and192 page companion book are all about – the art of healing. Each card has an astrological association. The Major Arcana express the pure energy of one of the ten planets or twelve signs of the zodiac. Court Cards reveal the dynamic combination of the four elements (fire, water, air, and earth) with the three ways that energy expresses itself (start, change, and stop), and the three categories of the astrological signs (cardinal, fixed, and mutable). The Minor Arcana explore the key planet-in-sign combinations.

Lucina discusses well placed versus poorly placed cards, positive and negative astrological combinations, and traditional relationships of the planets with each other. She also does an introduction to the Qabalistic Tree of Life.

This deck is done in black and white drawing style. In explaining why use of color was not made, Lucina felt that in keeping to black and white the focus would be on the healing information (the health and wellness messages) being imparted, rather than on the imagery in the cards. The return to original form (black and white) was made in order to see the things that the colors might be obscuring.

Each card is presented with a black and white scan. The Major Arcana shows the card number and title, spiritual perspective, a discussion of the card, astrological connections, the traditional interpretation, and the upright and reversed health meanings. The Court Cards are presented with their suit name and rank, traditional interpretation, specific body imbalances and revered health meaning. The Minor Arcana Pips (numbered cards) are presented with the card number and suit, traditional meaning, and upright and reversed health meaning.

Three unique card spreads are presented: the Acute Illness Spread, the Healthy Zodiac Spread, and the Diet/Fitness spread.

In her conclusion, Lucina states:

When living in a state of wellness – body, emotions, mind, and spirit in harmony – life is an incredible journey of dynamic exploration of the inner universe within oneself and external universe of All That Is.

 

When living in a state of dis-ease – imbalance, disconnection, anxiety, and discomfort – life is an extended prison sentence of bondage to the body while the physical universe becomes a confusing, painful, restrictive bad joke.”

 THT card back

The cards themselves are 3” by 5”, of sturdy, glossy card stock. The background color on the card backs is a reddish brown. There is a small white cross centered on the top and the bottom of the card, under which we see the name of the deck in black letters. The imagery is that of two circles – one a globe of the world, the other containing an image of Vitruvian Man, above which we see a caduceus with a light colored snake and a dark colored snake wound around it. The backs are reversible.

The card faces are white, with a light gray cross at the top and bottom of each card. The imagery is black pen and ink drawing style. The name of the card appears in black on the upper right hand side of the card, and in the lower left hand side of the card (backwards, in a mirror image). The Major Arcana cards do not carry a number. The Minor Arcana Pips (numbered cards) show the card number and suit in the upper right hand side of the card, and in the lower left hand side of the card (backwards, in a mirror image). The Court Cards show the title and suit across the top of the card, then again across the bottom of the card (backwards, in a mirror image).

The imagery in the deck goes along traditional lines, with an updated look as far as dress and background.

This deck could be used by all ages, and all backgrounds. The focus on health and healing opens up the manner in which Tarot can be used, and makes this deck a great addition for any Tarot library.

 

© 2000 – 2013 Bonnie Cehovet

 
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Posted by on June 16, 2013 in Tarot

 

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Review – The Inner Realms Tarot

Inner Realms Tarot

Author: Saleire
Artist: Saleire
Schiffer Publishing
2013
ISBN #978-0-7643-4391-9

Inner Realms Tarot cover

Schiffer Publishing has recently released several absolutely incredible decks! The “Inner Realms Tarot” certainly falls into that category. Author/artist Saleire is a lady that I have had the pleasure to get to know a bit on Facebook … she is brilliant, charming, and very authentic, just as  the deck she created!

The “Inner Realms Tarot” is a traditional 78 card Tarot deck. The Major Arcana carry the traditional titles, with Strength at VIII, and Justice at XI. The Minor Arcana suits are Wands, Cups, Swords, and Pentacles, with the Court Cards entitles King, Queen, Knight, and Page. The Minor Arcana Pips (numbered cards) arfe done Marseilles style – using icons, rather than scenic imagery. The deck and 128 page companion book come packaged in a trademark Schiffer lift top, hard cardboard box, with a magnetic lid. The box cover features the Ace of Swords, while the card back carries a message on how to use the cards.

The companion book features the Ace of Swords on the cover, and the Hermit on the back cover. From the introduction:

I have tried to create cards that are a quick and easy reference to the basic idea of Tarot. You do not have to spend  years learning the symbolism of Tarot before you can become a wonderfully caring Tarot reader. All you have to do is trust your inner guide, your senses, feelings, emotions, and thoughts. This is something books cannot teach you. A reader wants to help people: This is the key and the only qualification you need to become the best.”

 Saleire goes on to say that the artwork has been kept soft and dreamy … where Cups are made of blue light, and Swords are made of swirling energy, meant to set your imagination free. She recommends meditating with the images, as this gives you insight into what the cards mean to you. The words on the cards are meant to show where the reading is going. To make the reading work … Saleire suggests that you quiet the chatter in your head. Great suggestion! Truer words were never spoken! The reader is the boss … not the cards. They are not called the “Pasteboard Masquerade” for nothing!

Saleire entreats the reader to read with their senses … all of their senses! And to follow their instincts in interpreting the cards. She then takes it one step further … after the reader opens their deck, they are encouraged to imagine them surrounded by light, and to allow that light to flow into your heart. One last word on this chapter: “… each person who looks at the cards will see the same thing, but will interpret it differently”. Okay … one more thing! When a reading is over, rub your hands together, releasing the energy of the last Seeker’s reading before you being the next reading.

Three spreads are presented: the Three Card Spread, the Horseshoe Spread, and the traditional Celtic Cross Spread. Saleire suggests that the reader can change the words on the cards. SSShhhe suggests that they might consider the following: (1) What happened, (2) How the incident affects the present situation, and (3) What the Seeker can do about it.

Each card is presented with a black and white image, the card’s name, and a description of the card’s energy. From the book:

IX The Hermit

 It is time to seek within for answers, realize your path, and know that you are going in the right direction. You need this time to put things in perspective, contemplate, and relax. You are reading, studying, and searching everywhere for the answers, but sometimes the only thing that you need to do is ask yourself one question: Am I happy? If the answer is no, then you have work to do by seeking the truth about your life and why you are not happy. Look deeper into the meaning of life, and know where you stand. Ask again: Am I happy? If not, change your life and progress further along the path of truth.”

 At the end of the book there is a truly interesting section entitled Other Meanings. There are little tid bits of wisdom, such as the association of the elements and the zodiac signs with the suits; pairing of the suits (i.e. Cups paired with Swords represents “Trust your heart”); pairings of the Aces (i.e. the Ace of Wands and the Ace of Pentacles represents excitement and abundance); and pairing of the Court Cards(i.e. Page and Page represents two young people who you care about).

Inner Realms back

The cards themselves are 3 1/2” by 5”, of good quality, glossy card stock. The backs are a dark brown, with gold scroll-like imagery, and are reversible. The card faces show a dark brown background, with gold scrolling across the sides and bottom. For the Major Arcana, the name and number (in Roman numerals) are printed in gold across the top of the card. For the Minor Arcana Pips, the number and suit are printed in gold across the top of the card. For the Court Cards, the title and suit are printed in gold across the top of the card.

The Minor Arcana Pips are done in Marseilles style, showing icons only. Wands and Swords are done in blue, Cups and Pentacles in gold. The imagery on the Major Arcana cards is non-traditional, and very compelling. The Moon shows a hand in the middle of the card, palm  up. Water is pouring down from a full moon onto the hand, spilling over onto oearth. At the end of one fi ngertip we see a fully formed tree. The Hanged Man shows a phosphorescent form of a human being, hanging upside down from the fingers of a hand that is shown, palm down, at the top of the card. The Hierophant is a gold framed oval mirror. The Hermit shows a multi-colored “mythc” type creature’s face. The Fool shows an amorphous form moving through the card. Words that carry the energy of each card (Saleire does not call them keywords) are printed in different places throughout each carfd.

This is a deck for reading, ritual work, journeying, meditation, and more. The mystical style of the cards is carried out evenly throughout the deck, creating a magical world through which we can expand our wisdom about ourselves, and about the world around us.

(c) 2000 – 2013 Bonnie Cehovet

Reproduction prohibited in any venue without the written permission of the author.

 
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Posted by on June 8, 2013 in Tarot

 

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Review – The Tarot Lovers’ Tarot

The Tarot Lovers’ Tarot

Author: Karyn Easton
Artist: Karyn Easton
Schiffer Publishing Ltd.
2013
ISBN #978-0-7643-3902-8

rsz_tarot_lovers_tarot_box_2

The “Tarot Lovers’ Tarot” is an amazing deck, without which I would never have been able to publish my first book, “Tarot, Birth Cards, and You”! I was beyond ecstatic when Karyn told me that Schiffer had agreed to publish her deck! So much work had gone into both the artistry and the interpretations, and into getting the deck up on her site (www.paranormality.com), that publication was that last step that brought the process full circle. The deck now has its own site – www.tarot-lovers.com – but those who follow Karyn’s work will remember that she included a miniature version of the deck in her Tarot Lovers Diary (complete with backs, so that the cards could be cut out, laminated, and used as a deck). The backs were redone for the print deck.

rsz_tarot_lovers_tarot_lbb

This is a traditional 78 card deck, using traditional Major Arcana titles (with the following exceptions: Papess/High Priestess, Pope/Hierophant), placing Strength at VIII, and Justice at XI. The suit titles are Wands, Cups, Swords, and Coins (Pentacles), with the Court Card titles King, Queen, Knight, and Page. The cards are accompanied by a 208 page “Little Black Book”. I love the play on “Little White Book”, which is the usual terminology for the companion book to a Tarot deck! The cover is black with silver lettering. The word “Lovers” appears in a beautiful deep pink, with the initi (i.e. Aces arfe new beginningsal letter in gorgeous script! The box that the cards and companion book come in has the trademark Schiffer magnetic lid, with the cover matching the cover of the companion book. The back of the box shows the imagery of the Lovers’ card done in silver.

The Major Arcana cards are presented with the name of the card, the esoteric title, upright and reversed keywords, an explanation of each card’s energy in the upright and reversed (Ill Dignified) position, and a general statement for both the upright and revered positions as to what the energy is in the Seeker’s life. Card associations include card number, key number, rulership, Hebrew letter, translation, numerical value, astrological association, candle color, and crystal. The text is accompanied by a half-page black and white scan of the card.

Hidden meanings are listed for the Devil and the Moon:

The Devil: The Devil card in a spiritual position may indicate someone who is out of control and that something may need to be done about it. The Nine of Wands reversed, together with the Devil, may indicate that someone has a potential drinking problem.

The Moon: The Moon, together with the High Priestess, may signify gynecological issues and also psychic ability. The Moon with the Seven of Swords warns about who to trust and to be careful with money. The Moon with the Three of Swords warns against ill health.

The Minor Arcana Pips (numbered cards) are presented with the card name, esoteric title, associations for numerological value, element, tetragramaton, life aspect, and astrological association, along with keywords for the upright and reversed positions, a short discussion of the card’s energy, and a general statement about the card in both the upright and reversed (Ill Dignified) positions.

The Court cards are presented with the title and suit, the esoteric name, the numerological value, element, elemental name, tetragrammaton, hair color, eye color, life aspect, and astrological association. Upright and reversed keywords are presented, along with a short discussion of the card’s energy in both positions. There is also a general statement for both positions.

Examples of the card statements include:

Fool (upright): Follow your head as well as your heart and make sure all’s in place beforfe you depart.

Fool (reversed): Feeling blocked, nothing to say, stay true to your dreams and get back on your way.

Nine of Wands (upright): When you make your last stand be sure to know that help is at hand.

Nine of Wands (reversed): When you fear you are all alone, you’re quite right – you’re on you’re the Marseilles style own.

Queen of Coins (upright): Hair so dark, and eyes too, this caring woman is an asset to you.

Queen of Coins (reversed): Hair so dark, and eyes too, she hates secondhand, and only buys new.

Under Additional Notes at the back of the book we find themes for each of the Pips (i.e. Aces are new beginnings, Fives are tricky karmic change), and what the Pips mean in a spread (i.e. 4 Aces can indicate power, 3 Aces can indicate wealth, 2 Aces can indicate moves), and what the Court Cards can mean in a spread (i.e. 4 Knights indicate military, 3 Knight indicate people, 2 Knights indicate old friends).

Tarot Lovers Tarot card back

The cards themselves are 3.5” by 5.5”, with sturdy, glossy card stock. I adore the elegant card back – a black background, with the same graphic that is on the cover of the companion book and the box. The backs are reversible. The card faces have a ½” wide white border, surrounding a fine black border. For the Major Arcana, the card number and title runs across the top in English, with the card title in French across the bottom. The Pips show the card number is Roman Numerals across the top, and the suit across the bottom. The Court Cards show the title across the top, and the suit across the bottom.

The artwork is very simple, with the Pips done in the Marseilles style (icons only). Tradition has been followed in that the Four of Coins has the artist’s (engraver’s) trademark in the center (this has also been done with the Four of Cups).  There are some lovely touches, such as the butterfly on the Papess, the astrological signs floating around the Wheel of Fortune, the rainbow colored stream of water on both Temperance and the Star, the Devil playing a violin, and the fish on either side of the figure in the World!

This is a very special deck, IMHO. The artwork, the tending to tradition, and the time spent on presenting the information on the cards shows a very professional and caring attitude. A welcome addition to any Tarot library! Viva “Little Black Book”!

© 2000 – 2013 Bonnie Cehovet

Reproduction in any venue prohibited without written permission from the author.

 
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Posted by on June 1, 2013 in Tarot

 

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